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2 changed to better reflect the IEEE standards
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MaxOriginally, max. MTU isn'tpayload was defined as 1500 bytes, most in 802.3. Ethernet v2 supports frame length of >=1536 and this is what IP implementations use. Most carrier-class vendors support around 9000 bytes ("jumbo frames") these days. If I remember correctly, Since 1500 bytes was a recommendation forbyte is the minimum supported MTU andstandard that all Ethernet implementations must support, this is sort of a "silent agreement" nowwhat is normally set as default on all interfaces.

Max. MTU isn't 1500 bytes, most carrier-class vendors support around 9000 bytes ("jumbo frames") these days. If I remember correctly, 1500 bytes was a recommendation for the minimum supported MTU and is sort of a "silent agreement" now.

Originally, max. payload was defined as 1500 bytes in 802.3. Ethernet v2 supports frame length of >=1536 and this is what IP implementations use. Most carrier-class vendors support around 9000 bytes ("jumbo frames") these days. Since 1500 byte is the standard that all Ethernet implementations must support, this is what is normally set as default on all interfaces.

1
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Max. MTU isn't 1500 bytes, most carrier-class vendors support around 9000 bytes ("jumbo frames") these days. If I remember correctly, 1500 bytes was a recommendation for the minimum supported MTU and is sort of a "silent agreement" now.