3 added 8 characters in body
source | link

No.

Ethernet switches are transparent devices, so they do not alter the ethernet frames (except to add and remove 802.1Q tags for trunks). There is nothing in the ethernet frame header that supports what you ask, and a switch does not add anything, making it look like the source host is directly communicating with the destination host on a dedicated link.

The best you could do is to have some application or tool on your capture device that tries to match the source MAC addresses on frames with what is in the switch MAC address table, but that is something you would need to come up with on your own.


You could use the various methods to prevent thatthe spoofing in the first place. For example, DHCP snooping with Dynamic ARP Inspection and IP Source Guard. You can also use 802.1X.

No.

Ethernet switches are transparent devices, so they do not alter the ethernet frames (except to add and remove 802.1Q tags for trunks). There is nothing in the ethernet frame header that supports what you ask, and a switch does not add anything, making it look like the source host is directly communicating with the destination host on a dedicated link.

The best you could do is to have some application or tool on your capture device that tries to match the source MAC addresses on frames with what is in the switch MAC address table, but that is something you would need to come up with on your own.


You could use the various methods to prevent that in the first place. For example, DHCP snooping with Dynamic ARP Inspection and IP Source Guard. You can also use 802.1X.

No.

Ethernet switches are transparent devices, so they do not alter the ethernet frames (except to add and remove 802.1Q tags for trunks). There is nothing in the ethernet frame header that supports what you ask, and a switch does not add anything, making it look like the source host is directly communicating with the destination host on a dedicated link.

The best you could do is to have some application or tool on your capture device that tries to match the source MAC addresses on frames with what is in the switch MAC address table, but that is something you would need to come up with on your own.


You could use the various methods to prevent the spoofing in the first place. For example, DHCP snooping with Dynamic ARP Inspection and IP Source Guard. You can also use 802.1X.

2 deleted 1 character in body
source | link

No.

Ethernet switches are transparent devices, so they do not alter the ethernet frames (except to add and remove 802.1Q tags for trunks). There is nothing in the ethernet frame header that supports what you ask, and a switch does not add anything, making it look like the source host is directly communicating with the destination host on a dedicated link.

The best you could do is to have some application or tool on your capture device that tries to match the source MAC addresses on frames with what is in the switch MAC address table, but that is something you would need to come up with on your own.


You could use the various methods to prevent that in the first place. For example, DHCP snooping with Dynamic ARP InspectionsInspection and IP Source Guard. You can also use 802.1X.

No.

Ethernet switches are transparent devices, so they do not alter the ethernet frames (except to add and remove 802.1Q tags for trunks). There is nothing in the ethernet frame header that supports what you ask, and a switch does not add anything, making it look like the source host is directly communicating with the destination host on a dedicated link.

The best you could do is to have some application or tool on your capture device that tries to match the source MAC addresses on frames with what is in the switch MAC address table, but that is something you would need to come up with on your own.


You could use the various methods to prevent that in the first place. For example, DHCP snooping with Dynamic ARP Inspections and IP Source Guard. You can also use 802.1X.

No.

Ethernet switches are transparent devices, so they do not alter the ethernet frames (except to add and remove 802.1Q tags for trunks). There is nothing in the ethernet frame header that supports what you ask, and a switch does not add anything, making it look like the source host is directly communicating with the destination host on a dedicated link.

The best you could do is to have some application or tool on your capture device that tries to match the source MAC addresses on frames with what is in the switch MAC address table, but that is something you would need to come up with on your own.


You could use the various methods to prevent that in the first place. For example, DHCP snooping with Dynamic ARP Inspection and IP Source Guard. You can also use 802.1X.

1
source | link

No.

Ethernet switches are transparent devices, so they do not alter the ethernet frames (except to add and remove 802.1Q tags for trunks). There is nothing in the ethernet frame header that supports what you ask, and a switch does not add anything, making it look like the source host is directly communicating with the destination host on a dedicated link.

The best you could do is to have some application or tool on your capture device that tries to match the source MAC addresses on frames with what is in the switch MAC address table, but that is something you would need to come up with on your own.


You could use the various methods to prevent that in the first place. For example, DHCP snooping with Dynamic ARP Inspections and IP Source Guard. You can also use 802.1X.