2

In order to save the configuration on Cisco Switches one could execute wr. However this does not seem to work on Cisco ASA 5505. Although the system indicates that the config has been saved, a reboot results in data loss.

According to this documentation one could execute write memory to store the config on ASA, but this does save the data neither.

Saving config

ciscoasa# conf t
ciscoasa(config)# int vl 100
ciscoasa(config-if)# end
ciscoasa# sh sw vl
VLAN Name                        Status     Ports
---- --------------------------- ---------- -----------------------------
1    -                           down       Et0/0, Et0/1, Et0/2, Et0/3
                                            Et0/4, Et0/5, Et0/6, Et0/7
100  -                           down
ciscoasa# write memory
Building configuration...
Cryptochecksum: X Y Z

1269 bytes copied in 1.230 secs (1269 bytes/sec)
[OK]

Config after reboot

rommon #0> boot
...
ciscoasa> en
Password: 
ciscoasa# sh sw vl
VLAN Name                        Status     Ports
---- --------------------------- ---------- -----------------------------
1    -                           down       Et0/0, Et0/1, Et0/2, Et0/3
                                            Et0/4, Et0/5, Et0/6, Et0/7

ciscoasa#
5

First check your current config register value. You can do that using sh ve command.

The default value is 0x1.

You can find possible values here.

  • Configuration register is 0x40. According to the documentation it should change right in order to save the configuration? Do you know how to change the configuration register? Does this need to be changed to 0x1? – 030 Aug 16 '14 at 15:05
  • I have issued config-register 0x1 and sh ve results in: Configuration register is 0x40 (will be 0x1 at next reload). Will the data be lost if the ASA is shutdown? Will the data be correctly saved after a reboot? – 030 Aug 16 '14 at 15:09
  • 3
    The configuration register determines if the configuration in nvram will be loaded after boot or not. It does not interfere with the saving of the configuration. You can check the currently stored configuration with show startup-config. – RedShift Aug 16 '14 at 17:19

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