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I am trying to create a separate subnet, which is isolated from my LAN subnet. I want some controlled traffic flow between these subnets. I hope to control it using the Sonicwall firewall rules. But here is the thing, I want the machines to see each other directly, if allowed through the rules. What I mean is I want no NAT translation.

LAN_1: 172.16.1.0 LAN_2: 192.168.1.0

LAN_1 is the default LAN, the SonicWall LAN IP is 172.16.1.1

The SonicWall has 5 interfaces. X0 is LAN interface (LAN_1) and X1 is WAN.

I am wondering about how to setup LAN_2. Do I buy separate router, or can SonicWall give me this routing ability, if I define one of the available interfaces (X2,X3,X4) for connecting LAN_2?

Keep in mind I am no network engineer, but I am often forced to play that role.

  • What OS is the client pc? Remember that by default, Windows 7 doesn't respond to pings. – user11937 Dec 17 '14 at 13:10
  • It is Vista. I can't even ping 192.168.1.1 from the client PC. The Sonicwall is not setting itself to that address. – Sharath Dec 17 '14 at 13:37
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What I mean is I want no NAT translation.

That is the default behaviour. Adding NAT translation between neighboring subnets would not be an 'enabled by default' feature. Simply adding those subnets into your SonicWall would allow them to communicate as long as your hosts are pointing to it as a default gateway.

I am wondering about how to setup LAN_2. Do I buy separate router, or can SonicWall give me this routing ability, if I define one of the available interfaces (X2,X3,X4) for connecting LAN_2?

SonicWall will give you that capability without the need for any additional routers. You may need more switches to deal with the additional hosts on your second subnet (LAN_2).

You're on the right track with the interfaces. Use any of the additional interfaces you have. Logically, your setup should look like this in the end.

               +-----------+ X0 ---- 172.16.1.1/24
WAN_IP ---- X1 | SonicWall | 
               +-----------+ X2 ---- 192.168.1.1/24

In this instance, X0 and X2 will be able to communicate.

  • I added a interface with zone=LAN vlan=1 parent_interface=X0 IP=192.168.1.1/24, and then connected a PC to X2 with IP 192.168.1.2/24. I am unable to ping it. – Sharath Dec 17 '14 at 10:33
  • Have you put a rule in your firewall to allow communications between those subnets? – Ryan Foley Dec 17 '14 at 11:48
  • Under LAN > LAN Any-to-Any is allowed, by default. – Sharath Dec 17 '14 at 12:29
  • I tried to ping the gateway (Sonicwall) at 192.168.1.1 from the PC connected to X2. If Sonicwall is acting as router, shouldn't it respond to the interface address I assigned to that interface X2? – Sharath Dec 17 '14 at 13:40
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    Yeah...it is working. :-) There was one twist in defining interface. Instead of adding the interface, we should select "show portshield interface" and then edit X2 to set the IP address. That way X2 will be became an independent interface. Then we can use the firewall rules to set the rules. – Sharath Dec 17 '14 at 14:33
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If you have routers on your interfaces, you can configure static routes on the SonicWALL. Static routing means configuring the SonicWALL to route network traffic to a specific, predefined destination. Static routes must be defines if the LAN, WAN, or other defined interface is segmented into subnets, either for size or practical considerations. For example, a subnet can be created to isolate a section of a company network, such as finance, from network traffic on the rest of the LAN, WAN, or DMZ. Static Routes

Static Routes are configured when network traffic is directed to subnets located behind routers on your network. For example, you have a router on your network with the IP address of 192.168.168.254, and there is another subnet on your network with an IP address range of 10.0.5.0 - 10.0.5.254 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. To configure a static route to the 10.0.5.0 subnet, follow these instructions:

Click Add in the Static Routes section. The Add Static Route window is displayed.

Type 10.0.5.0 in the Destination Network field.

Type 255.255.255.0 in the Subnet Mask field.

Type 192.168.168.254 in the Default Gateway field. This is the IP address of the router.

Select LAN from the Interface menu.
Click OK.

Note! You can configure up to 512 routes on the SonicWALL. Static Route Configuration Example

Static Route configurations allow multiple subnets separated by an internal (LAN) router to be supported behind the SonicWALL LAN. This option is only to be used when the secondary subnet is accessed through an internal (LAN) router that is between it and the SonicWALL LAN port. Once static routes are configured, network traffic can be directed to these subnets.

The following are key terms used for this static route example:

Destination Network - the network IP address of the remote subnet. The address usually ends in 0, such as 10.0.5.0.
Subnet Mask - the subnet mask of the remote network, such as 255.255.255.0.
Gateway - the IP address of the internal (LAN) router that is local to the SonicWALL.

Example Addresses:

SonicWALL LAN IP Address: 192.168.168.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Router IP Address: 192.168.168.254
Secondary Subnet: 10.0.5.0
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0

With the internal (LAN) router on your network using the IP address of 192.168.168.254, and there is another subnet on your network using the IP address range of 10.0.5.0 - 10.0.5.254 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, follow these instructions to configure a static router to the 10.0.5.0 subnet:

In the Network>Routing page, click Add in the Static Routes section.

Type 10.0.5.0 in the Destination Network field.

Type 255.255.255.0 in the Subnet Mask field.

Type 192.168.168.254 in the Default Gateway field. This is the IP address of the internal (LAN) router that is local to the SonicWALL.

Select LAN from the Interface menu.

Click OK.

Note! Make sure the internal (LAN) router is configured as follows: If the SonicWALL has a NAT Policy on the WAN, the internal (LAN) router needs to have a route of last resort (Gateway Address) that is the SonicWALL LAN IP address. Route Advertisement

The SonicWALL uses RIPv1 or RIPv2 (Routing Information Protocol) to advertise its static and dynamic routes to other routers on the network. Changes in the status of VPN tunnels between the SonicWALL and remote VPN gateways are also reflected in the RIPv2 advertisements. Choose between RIPv1 or RIPv2 based on your router's capabilities or configuration. RIPv1 is an earlier version of the protocol that has fewer features, and it also sends packets via broadcast instead of multicast. RIPv2 packets are backwards-compatible and can be accepted by some RIPv1 implementations that provide an option of listening for multicast packets. The RIPv2 Enabled (broadcast) selection broadcasts packets instead of multicasting packets is for heterogeneous networks with a mixture of RIPv1 and RIPv2 routers.

You can configure route advertisements for each Interface/zone by clicking on the Notepad icon in the Configure column of Route Advertisement table, which displays the Route Advertisement Configuration window. Routing Table

The Routing Table displays a list of destinations that the IP software maintains on each host and router. The Destination Network IP address, Subnet Mask, Gateway Address, and the corresponding Destination Link are displayed. Most of the entries are the result of configuring LAN and WAN network settings. The SonicWALL LAN and WAN IP addresses are displayed as permanently published at all times.

http://help.mysonicwall.com/sw/eng/305/ui2/22010/Network/Routing.htm

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