2

Is it possible for the throughput to be greater than the bandwidth of the cable ?Is it normal to have an average throughput of 10.401 Mbits/s on a cable of 10Mbits/s ?

5

Is it possible for the throughput to be greater than the bandwidth of the cable ?

Like many things, the devil is often in the details. Depending on how the measurement is taken, then yes it is possible. For instance, if you are using some sort of data compression and an application is measuring the amount of actual (uncompressed) data sent between two end points.

With no data compression, the same means of measuring can produce a lower throughput than the actual number of bits sent across the medium. This is because overhead (such as frame or packet headers for example) may not be counted.

Is it normal to have an average throughput of 10.401 Mbits/s on a cable of 10Mbits/s ?

In my experience, no it is not normal to expect compression on a network link. However it is fairly common for forms of compression to exist at higher levels of the OSI model, such as HTTP compression.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.