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I am starting the design stage of a project dealing with Internet of Things (IoT) devices based on the recent ESP8266 serial to WiFi module.

As part of the test environment I will need to setup, I would like to create a separate "area" for all ESP8266 based devieces on the network. I am not sure if subnet is the correct term here. The regular devices (servers, workstations, printers, etc) on the network should have their own IP address range, and the IoT devices another. To get a better understanding, here are my requirements:

1) Regular network clients have their own IP address range managed by DHCP. No more than 254 clients. Also has the internet gateway on it.

2) IoT devices have their own IP address range - no more than 254 devices.

3) IoT network area will also have a Raspberry Pi webserver

4) All regular network clients should be able to communicate with all IoT devices, especially the Raspberry pi server

5) Raspberry Pi must be able to multicast to IoT devices, but not regular clients

6) IoT and Raspberry Pi must have internet access through internet gateway

My first thought was to stick a router between the regular clients and IoT devices, with the WAN port connected to my normal network and use the routers Virtual Server feature to access the Raspberry Pi, however, this wouldn't satisfy requirement 4 completely.

I have a very limited budget, so business networking hardware is out of the question.

Thanks, Matt

At the request of a more specific question:

Regarding my requirements, how would I implement such a network? Is this possible with consumer hardware, or is this limited to business/enterprise hardware?

closed as off-topic by Mike Pennington, Craig Constantine Jul 2 '15 at 14:09

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "NE is a site for to ask and provide answers about professionally managed networks in a business environment. Your question falls outside the areas our community decided are on topic. Please visit the help center for more details. If you disagree with this closure, please ask on Network Engineering Meta." – Craig Constantine
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Please be explicit about what question you want us to help with. – Mike Pennington Jul 2 '15 at 2:58
  • Consumer hardware is off-topic here. So if you're budget limits you to only consumer hardware... this is then off topic here. – Craig Constantine Jul 2 '15 at 14:09
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I make the assumption that

  • the IOT devices has fixed IP's.
  • the Rasberry Pi is linux and can do routing.

Summary.

  • Use two ip subnets on same network, let Rasberry Pi route between subnets (or Www GW if it can)
  • On Internet gw device add static route pointing to Rasberry Pi for the IOT subnet.

Answering questions

1) Regular network clients have their own IP address range managed by DHCP. No more than 254 clients. Also has the internet gateway on it.

Only need a fixed IP for Rasberry Pi in client range, and static route on internet gateway pointing new IOT subnet to Rasberry Pi fixed ip.

2) IoT devices have their own IP address range - no more than 254 devices.

Fixed ip's, also one ip on Rasberry Pi

3) IoT network area will also have a Raspberry Pi webserver

OK ? 2nd Raspberry Pi ?

4) All regular network clients should be able to communicate with all IoT devices, especially the Raspberry pi server

They will send traffic to GW that will route back to Rasberry Pi

5) Raspberry Pi must be able to multicast to IoT devices, but not regular clients

No problem if they are same physical network

6) IoT and Raspberry Pi must have internet access through internet gateway1

Fine if IOT has Raspberry Pi as default GW and Raspberry Pi has default route pointing to Internet GW

The other option is to do the inter-subnet routing on the Internet GW if it is capable of taking a secondary IP in the IOT subnet. In this case just make this ip the default GW on all the IOT devices.

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It sounds like you want to implement virtual LANs, VLANs. You will want a multilayer (often called layer 3) switch to do this. If you need more than 48 wired Ethernet ports, get a switch that is capable of stacking into a virtual/logical switch.

As for IoT, that is a marketing term, not a technical term.

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