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Is there any common factor (similarity) between circuit switching or packet switching theory with the working principle of Spray and Wait routing protocol? If not, then what is the main difference?

I mean "most network routing protocols are designed for use in fairly stable networks where paths can be known"- does it refer to circuit switching theory where a complete path needs to be established before sending message?

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  • Did any answer help you? If so, you should accept the answer so that the question doesn't keep popping up forever, looking for an answer. Alternatively, you can provide your own answer and accept it. – Ron Maupin Aug 6 '17 at 23:50
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You are back to comparing apples and oranges. You just can't compare two dissimilar things.

Routing protocols are used to determine the direction traffic should be sent. How it is sent (switched) in that direction has nothing to do with the routing protocol.

You can use a map to determine the direction to go to get to a particular location (routing), but how you get to the destination (switching) can be by walking, car, bus, plane, train, etc. One really doesn't necessarily depend on the other.

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  • "Routing protocols are used to determine the direction traffic should be sent"- then does 'spray and wait' routing protocol just only decide the number of neighbour nodes to which the message copy will be sent? @Ron Maupin – user5216540 Oct 23 '15 at 6:09
  • That's a different question altogether, and it actually requires you to post a new question. The source for information about the Spray and Wait protocol is the defining paper which may be found at several academic sites through a simple search. However, I would caution that someone like you, who does not yet understand the difference between a routing protocol and a switching method, not get ahead of yourself. Learn the basics about networking in a structured way, first. I applaud your initiative, and I want to encourage your learning, but I think you are going about it all wrong. – Ron Maupin Oct 23 '15 at 15:09
  • +1 for routing vs switching analogy. Well said: You can use a map to determine the direction to go to get to a particular location (routing), but how you get to the destination (switching) can be by walking, car, bus, plane, train, etc. – Eddie Mar 21 '16 at 17:19

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