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I'm using an Edgemax router (EdgeOs), and even after having read posts and checked internet pages, I'm still very confused about which of my ethernet interfaces are communicating with what.

My LAN is on eth2 and my WAN on eth1. Can someone tell me if I'm wrong about what's next (because I saw a lot of opposite answers on network tutorials):

  • eth2/in is the part of my interface that receive packets from the LAN,
  • eth2/out deals with packets from LAN that will go to the WAN and
  • eth2/local are packets from LAN that "travel" through the LAN. Is that right?
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  • Sounds right to me. /in and /out at least. – Peter Nov 10 '15 at 12:45
  • what about "local"? – Andriniaina Andy Nkili Meyong Nov 10 '15 at 12:46
  • I dont know anything about EdgeOS and havent heard about that notation before. But your guess sounds reasonable to me. – Peter Nov 10 '15 at 12:48
  • Can you post the example of where these terms are used? I can't find them in the admin guide. – Ron Trunk Nov 10 '15 at 14:58
  • when you want to set up firewall rules, you have to define on which interface you them to be applied – Andriniaina Andy Nkili Meyong Nov 10 '15 at 15:31
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Ethernet interfaces are named eth0, eth1, eth2, etc.

ethn/in and ethn/out, in firewall rules, identify respectively the ingress and egress point for a packet that travels through physical interface ethn.

If your LAN is on eth2 and your WAN on eth1, eth2/in receives packets from the LAN and eth2/out deals with packets destined to the LAN.

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Late to the party but hopefully this helps someone else.

/in Matches on established/related and invalid traffic that is passed through the router (WAN to LAN).

/local Matches on established/related and invalid traffic that is destined for the router itself (WAN to LOCAL).

/out Matches on established/related and invalid traffic that is passed through the router (LAN to WAN). (not explicitly mentioned, but I presume this is the case)

See here

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