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I want to create static routes:

Router A: IP route 192.168.20.0 255.255.255.0   10.1.1.2
Router A: IP route 172.13.0.0   255.255.0.0     10.2.2.2
Router A: IP route 10.3.3.0     255.255.255.252 10.2.2.2
Router A: IP route 192.168.30.0 255.255.255.0   10.2.2.2

Router B: IP route 172.14.0.0   255.255.0.0     10.2.2.1
Router B: IP route 192.168.30.0 255.255.255.0   10.3.3.2
Router B: IP route 10.4.4.0     255.255.255.252 10.3.3.2
Router B: IP route 192.168.20.0 255.255.255.0   10.3.3.2

Router C: IP route 192.168.30.0 255.255.255.0   10.4.4.2
Router C: IP route 172.14.0.0   255.255.0.0     10.1.1.1
Router C: IP route 10.2.2.0     255.255.255.252 10.1.1.1
Router C: IP route 172.13.0.0   255.255.0.0     10.1.1.1

Router D: IP route 172.13.0.0   255.255.0.0     10.3.3.1
Router D: IP route 192.168.20.0 255.255.255.0   10.4.4.1
Router D: IP route 10.1.1.0     255.255.255.252 10.4.4.1
Router D: IP route 172.14.0.0   255.255.0.0     10.4.4.1

enter image description here


I was wondering, what about the 2Mbps Link, should I route it, too?

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  • You will need to edit your question to provide more context before anyone can intelligently answer your question. – Ron Maupin Dec 25 '15 at 15:21
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The answer depends on what you're trying to do. If you don't create static routes, the link will not be used.

By using static routes as you have, you have no redundancy in your network even though you have multiple paths to each network. This would be a good application for a routing protocol.

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For the 2Mbit link, you might want to create a floating static route. This is a route with a higher administrative distance than your "primary" route to a subnet, so it will only be used in case the primary route in unavailable

Since you're using static routes, you'll need an AD of 2 or higher for your floating route.

For example, on cisco devices:

RouterC(config)# ip route 172.13.0.0 255.255.0.0 10.5.5.1 10
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    The problem with floating static routes is that it only considers the local interfaces. If you're trying to get from B to C, and the link from A to C fails (or the link from D to C), B doesn't know and still forwards traffic to A. Floating static routes won't help. – Ron Trunk Dec 25 '15 at 17:44

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