6

I am a little confused with the bandwidth setting on Tunnel interfaces between two Cisco devices.

On each end I have Cisco routers with ten gig interfaces connected to my provider. I Have a tunnel connecting two sites together. However the bandwidth statements don't seem to add up. My Tx/Rx look like they are maxed out. However the traffic on the input/output counters do not reflect the same as the bandwidth should be allowing.

Am I really choking out in the tunnel and not using my full interface bandwidth?

Router 1

    Tunnel45 is up, line protocol is up 
      Hardware is Tunnel
      Internet address is z.z.z.z
      MTU 17868 bytes, BW 100 Kbit/sec, DLY 50000 usec, 
         reliability 255/255, txload 255/255, rxload 255/255
      Encapsulation TUNNEL, loopback not set
      Keepalive set (10 sec), retries 3
      Tunnel source x.x.x.x (TenGigabitEthernet3/4), destination y.y.y.y
       Tunnel Subblocks:
          src-track:
             Tunnel45 source tracking subblock associated with TenGigabitEthernet3/4
              Set of tunnels with source TenGigabitEthernet3/4, 11 members (includes iterators), on interface <OK>
      Tunnel protocol/transport GRE/IP
        Key disabled, sequencing disabled
        Checksumming of packets disabled
      Tunnel TTL 255, Fast tunneling enabled
      Tunnel transport MTU 9078 bytes
      Tunnel transmit bandwidth 8000 (kbps)
      Tunnel receive bandwidth 8000 (kbps)
      30 second input rate 47213000 bits/sec, 6452 packets/sec
      30 second output rate 85312000 bits/sec, 9380 packets/sec

    interface Tunnel45
     ip address z.z.z.z
     load-interval 30
     keepalive 10 3
     tunnel source TenGigabitEthernet3/4
     tunnel destination x.x.x.x

Router 2

    Tunnel45 is up, line protocol is up 
      Hardware is Tunnel
      Internet address is z.z.z.z
      MTU 9976 bytes, BW 100 Kbit/sec, DLY 50000 usec, 
         reliability 255/255, txload 255/255, rxload 255/255
      Encapsulation TUNNEL, loopback not set
      Keepalive set (10 sec), retries 3
      Tunnel linestate evaluation up
      Tunnel source x.x.x.x (TenGigabitEthernet0/0/4), destination y.y.y.y
       Tunnel Subblocks:
          src-track:
             Tunnel45 source tracking subblock associated with TenGigabitEthernet0/0/4
              Set of tunnels with source TenGigabitEthernet0/0/4, 2 members (includes iterators), on interface <OK>
      Tunnel protocol/transport GRE/IP
        Key disabled, sequencing disabled
        Checksumming of packets disabled
      Tunnel TTL 255, Fast tunneling enabled
      Tunnel transport MTU 9078 bytes
      Tunnel transmit bandwidth 2000000 (kbps)
      Tunnel receive bandwidth 2000000 (kbps)
      30 second input rate 49418000 bits/sec, 5955 packets/sec
      30 second output rate 33804000 bits/sec, 4266 packets/sec

     interface Tunnel45
     ip address z.z.z.z
     load-interval 30
     keepalive 10 3
     tunnel source TenGigabitEthernet0/0/4
     tunnel destination y.y.y.y
     tunnel bandwidth transmit 2000000
     tunnel bandwidth receive 2000000
    end
5

Cisco IOS/NX-OS/etc. software does not configure the bandwidth for a virtual tunnel interface based on the physical interface to which it is assigned; instead, it applies a default "bandwidth" statement to the interface that depends on model of hardware and the version of software it is running (on many devices the default "BW" for a tunnel is 8kbps!).

As others have mentioned, this bandwidth statement does not actively affect the traffic throughput capability of the tunnel interface- tunnel traffic throughput is limited only by CPU traffic processing capability (if tunnel processing is not being performed in HW- usually not a limitation on most cisco routers unless this is being performed at scale) and the physical interface forwarding hardware. The only exception would be if BW-based QoS policies or custom routing configurations (e.g. non-default EIGRP implementation) were implemented on the tunnel interface, but based on the config you have shared that does not appear to be the case.

The displayed BW, txload and rxload counters that you are worried about are cosmetic only (unless the QoS/routing scenarios above apply) and will not -on their own- limit traffic throughput in any way. If you want the counters to display accurate information, configure the following on each tunnel interface:

interface tunnel <Tunnel Number> ! e.g. int tu45
  bandwidth <BW in kbps> ! e.g. bandwidth 2000000 -(2Gbps)
1

Those numbers are "advisory only". They aren't a means of policing the traffic rate.

rtr3745(config-if)#tunnel ?
  bandwidth           Set tunnel bandwidth informational parameter

It's information other protocols (routing, QoS, etc.) can use to select an interface, size queues, etc.

1

I don't think your tunnel bandwidth commands are actually doing anything since you are not running RBSCP. tunnel bandwidth transmit and tunnel bandwidth receive are only used with RBSCP - rate based satellite control protocol.

Even an interface bandwdith command only documents a bandwidth for upper-layer protocols. To actually restrict bandwidth on an interface, you need to use traffic shaping/policing.

3
  • I don't want to restrict it, I wanted to make sure I was actually getting full bandwidth since at the top of interface it says my BW is 100Kb – Ippy Jan 6 '16 at 23:36
  • So should I be getting the full interface bandwidth? – Ippy Jan 6 '16 at 23:36
  • Unless you have installed something like traffic shaping to restrict the bandwidth, then you should be using the full bandwidth. – Ron Maupin Jan 7 '16 at 0:03
0

Check out VPNTTG (VPN Tunnel Traffic Grapher) is a software for SNMP monitoring and measuring the traffic load for IPsec (Site-to-Site, Remote Access) and SSL (With Client, Clientless) VPN tunnels on a Cisco ASA. It allows the user to see traffic load on a VPN tunnel over time in graphical form.

Advantage of VPNTTG over other SNMP based monitoring software’s is following: Other (commonly used) software’s are working with static OID numbers, i.e. whenever tunnel disconnects and reconnects, it gets assigned a new OID number. This means that the historical data, gathered on the connection, is lost each time. However, VPNTTG works with VPN peer’s IP address and it stores for each VPN tunnel historical monitoring data into the Database.

For more information about VPNTTG please visit http://www.vpnttg.com

1
  • Product or resource recommendations are explicitly off-topic here. – Ron Maupin Jun 24 '17 at 6:11

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