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This question already has an answer here:

I think I mostly understand how subnetting/subnet masks work. However, there is one example that tripped me up while doing some practice questions.

With a subnet address like 125.95.39.0 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.128, I understand that the possible IP addresses for this subnet range from 125.95.39.1 to 125.95.39.126.

However, what about a subnet address like 125.95.39.129 that has a subnet mask of 255.255.255.192? What does this notation imply? I'm confused about this particular address because the last octet of this address is non-zero.

If I'm correct, this mask allows for 62 hosts in the network. Is 125.95.39.129 one of the hosts in this network, or are the possible IP address for this subnet 125.95.39.129 to 125.95.39.190?

Thanks in advance.

marked as duplicate by Ron Maupin, Ricky Beam, Teun Vink Apr 10 '16 at 9:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • See the link in the comment above for how to manipulate IP addressing. – Ron Maupin Apr 10 '16 at 2:49
  • Your edit is now asking a very different question. You should ask it in a new question, not change the existing question. – Ron Maupin Apr 10 '16 at 3:28
  • Ok, sorry about that. I'll revert the edits and create a new question. Thanks! – thomassawyer Apr 10 '16 at 3:29
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125.95.39.129 is already within the host portion of your subnet. Your correct network address would be 125.95.39.128/26 (255.255.255.192)

You may split an ip address range into multiple subnets even within the same octet. In case you are using a /26 subnet mask you divide the ip address range into segments of 2^6 (64) therefore you could divide a conventional /24 (255.255.255.0) range into 4x /26 ranges.

e.g. 125.95.39.0/26 125.95.39.64/26 125.95.39.128/26 125.95.39.192/26

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