1
  1. How many interfaces can we group as a link aggregation on a Cisco switch?
  2. How many interfaces, if they all are full duplex?
  3. Can we check the value of used bandwidth of ether channel group?
  4. How many groups can we make on a Cisco switch?
  • Did any answer help you? if so, you should accept the answer so that the question doesn't keep popping up forever, looking for an answer. Alternatively, you could provide and accept your own answer. – Ron Maupin Aug 8 '17 at 3:01
2
  1. Up to eight ports in a channel group.
  2. Up to eight ports in a channel group.
  3. Yes you can (see below); it's an interface.
  4. It depends on the switch model (see below).

For #3:

Interface Commands (show interfaces - show interfaces vg-anylan):

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces port-channel command:

Router# show interfaces port-channel 1


Port-channel1 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is FEChannel, address is 0000.0ca8.6220 (bia 0000.0000.0000)
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 400000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive not set, fdx
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
    No. of active members in this channel: 4
        Member 0 : Fast Ethernet1/0/0
        Member 1 : Fast Ethernet1/1/0
        Member 2 : Fast Ethernet4/0/0
        Member 3 : Fast Ethernet4/1/0
  Last input 01:22:13, output never, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     223 packets input, 11462 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 1 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     0 watchdog, 0 multicast
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     192 packets output, 13232 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

For #4:

System Requirements to Implement EtherChannel on Catalyst Switches

Catalyst 6500/6000 Series Switches That Run CatOS

  • With software release 6.3(1) and later releases, the maximum supported number of EtherChannels is 126 for a 6- or 9-slot chassis and 63 for a 13-slot chassis due to how the spanning-tree feature handles port IDs.

Catalyst 6500/6000 Series Switches That Run Cisco IOS Software

  • With Release 12.2(18)SXE and later releases, a Catalyst 6500 series switch supports a maximum of 128 EtherChannels. With releases earlier than Release 12.2(18)SXE, a Catalyst 6500 series switch supports a maximum of 64 EtherChannels.

Catalyst 5500/5000 Series Switches

[not specified]

Catalyst 4500/4000 Series Switches That Run CatOS

[not specified]

Catalyst 4500/4000 Series Switches That Run Cisco IOS Software

  • Catalyst 4500/4000 switches support a maximum of 64 EtherChannels. You can form an EtherChannel with up to eight compatibly configured Ethernet interfaces on any module and across modules in a Catalyst 4500/4000 switch.

Catalyst 3750 Series Switches

  • The Catalyst 3750 series switches support a maximum of 12 EtherChannels with configuration on a stack if the switch runs Cisco IOS Software Release 12.1. The Catalyst 3750 series switches can support a maximum of 48 etherchannels on the switch stack if the switch runs Cisco IOS Software Release12.2 or later.

Catalyst 3560 Series Switches

[not specified]

Catalyst 3550 Series Switches

[not specified]

Catalyst 2900XL/3500XL Series Switches

  • The Catalyst 2900XL/3500XL series switches support a maximum of 12 EtherChannel port groups in the switch.

Catalyst 2970 Series Switches

  • The Catalyst 2970 series switches support a maximum of 12 EtherChannels with configuration on the switch.

Catalyst 2960 Series Switches

[not specified]

Catalyst 2950/2955 Series Switches

  • Catalyst 2950/2955 series switches allow up to six port groups. The port groups can all have source as a basis, all have destination as a basis, or be a combination of source and destination bases. All ports in the group must be the same type. For example, the ports must all have source as a basis or all have destination as a basis.

Catalyst 2940 Series Switches

  • The Catalyst 2940 series switches support a maximum of six EtherChannels with eight ports per EtherChannel.

Catalyst Express 500 Series Switches

  • Catalyst Express 500 support up to 6 Fast EtherChannel or Gigabit EtherChannel groups.

Catalyst 1900/2820 Series Switches

  • Catalyst 1900/2820 series switches support only two port FECs.

Catalyst 2948G-L3, 4908G-L3, and 4840G Switches

  • Catalyst 2948G-L3 switch router supports up to 16 FECs with up to four adjacent Fast Ethernet ports per channel and one GEC.

  • Catalyst 4908G-L3 switch router supports up to four GECs with up to four Gigabit Ethernet ports per channel.

Catalyst 8500 Series Switch Routers and Cisco 7000 Series Router

  • Catalyst 8510 Campus Switch Router (CSR) supports up to four port FECs as one Layer 3 forwarding path.
  • You cannot have port-channels until you run out of ports, each series has a specific limit of total available port channels it can keep in it's table. Ref: cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/lan-switching/etherchannel/… – Fallacy11 Apr 11 '16 at 20:35
  • I was going to say, it depends on the platform. There are various things that create a limit, but I don't recall Cisco hard coding a number within IOS -- like there's no hard limit on subinterfaces; eventually, you'll run out of idb space. – Ricky Beam Apr 11 '16 at 20:59
  • I stand corrected. On the Cisco 4500 series which I have used in the past, there doesn't seem to be a limit on that like the other switches list, and the 3750 series, which we also use, has a limit of 48, but that is basically all the ports in a two switch stack, and the 3560 switches don't seem to have a limit, but 48, like the 3750 would be one on each port. I will correct the answer. – Ron Maupin Apr 11 '16 at 21:02

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