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Here is some information about my situation.

  • All firewalls have been turned off and everything involved has been restarted multiple times.
  • Client isolation on the router is disabled by default, the router is using factory DD WRT settings.
  • Both computers are setup to connect to an 802.1x (school) network that uses certificates for authentication.

When I go into the DD WRT page, I can see that it has assigned two local IP addresses to both of my devices on the LAN. I wish to ping one device from another device.

Heres what happens when I do the following things:

ping < ip of other computer >

request timeout for icmp_seq 0

To my understanding this means a route to the destination was found, but it did not respond in a certain amount of time. Good job router! but why is there no response? I am 99% sure that my firewall is off, and that I am not running any antivirus software at the moment.

plowing along

arp < ip of other computer >

< correct hostname! > < ip of other computer > at (incomplete) on en5 ifscope [ethernet]

Ok so my computer resolved the hostname but could not resolve the targets mac address. Am I correct in thinking that this should have resolved the mac address? Otherwise that would mean that my computers are on two different OSI level 2 networks even though they are plugged into the same router.

Does any of this make any sense? Networking is still pretty new to me, I really don't know what else I should try at this point.

Also links to articles that might help my understanding are welcome.

Thanks.

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  • home networking / consumer grade is off topic here, you can ask this on Super User stack Apr 17 '16 at 10:43
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"Ok so my computer resolved the hostname but could not resolve the targets mac address. Am I correct in thinking that this should have resolved the mac address? Otherwise that would mean that my computers are on two different OSI level 2 networks even though they are plugged into the same router."

ARP is used to map Layer 3 to Layer 2 addresses. If both computers are ondifferent networks, the host on network A wishing to communicate with the host on network B will need to know the MAC of the interface on the router facing the network A (default gateway), of course assuming you did the ARP test from one of the computers. You should be able to check on the router in it's ARP table whether it has all the L3 to L2 mappings.

What's the dd-wrt version? Have a look at:

http://svn.dd-wrt.com/ticket/3736

Adam

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    This worked! The solution was to enable vlan for the ethernet devices talking to the router. After this arp was able to find the other computer. Apr 17 '16 at 17:54

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