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I wonder why I can ping 192.168.3.50 /27 and 192.168.3.70 /27 from 192.168.3.100 /24. Is is not supposed to be impossible?

Problem to understand subnets

Thanks in advance for your help.

  • May be ports on the switch connecting machines having IP address .50, .70 and .100 are on same vlan and all other ports are on different vlan. And because of the you are able to ping .50 and .70 from .100 machine. Check for the configuration of the switch and if doubt still exist, the share your switch configuration. – Gaurav Kansal Oct 23 '16 at 16:49
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The host with the /24 address thinks that all the other hosts are on the same network, so it will happily send out a ping on the layer-2 network.

For a response to be sent back, the hosts need to believe that the requesting host is on the same network, otherwise the hosts will try to send a response to their configured gateways. There is something wrong in the configuration of the two hosts which do respond. Unfortunately, host configurations are off-topic here. The masks may be incorrectly configured, or, as I have seen in a few hosts, they do not have a gateway configured so they do respond. You need to figure out what is wrong with the configurations on those two hosts.

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you are using tree different network: 192.168.3.32 192.168.3.64 192.168.3.0 there is no way that a ping from one network can reach another network without a configured layer 3 device, probably your switch is a layer 3 switch configured with inter-Vlan routing.

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