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With the passage of time we have come to a stage where we are surrounded by various devices using WiFi as a medium of connectivity. But there is a problem, i.e. we can connect to only one WiFi device using our current WiFi radio at any given moment.

Is there a workaround for that? And why is that limitation with this?

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    You can always join the IEEE and work on the 802.11 standard. – Ron Maupin Jan 17 '17 at 14:38
  • Did any answer help you? If so, you should accept the answer so that the question doesn't keep popping up forever, looking for an answer. Alternatively, you could provide and accept your own answer. – Ron Maupin Aug 15 '17 at 18:59
  • Did any answer help you? If so, you should accept the answer so that the question doesn't keep popping up forever, looking for an answer. Alternatively, you could provide and accept your own answer. – Ron Maupin Aug 15 '17 at 19:01
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The CSMA/CA algorithm requires the AP to "coordinate" all the clients. If clients talked with other APs or with each other, it would be impossible to prevent interference.

Furthermore, the assumption is that your client is using Wi-Fi as an access layer technology to connect to a larger network. Why would you need to connect to more than one?

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  • Sometimes when I am connected to my personal WiFi network and I need to connect to my WiFi enabled hard disc I end up losing access to internet in the process. – Call me AK Jan 17 '17 at 14:53
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    Why not join your 802.11 enabled drive to your personal 802.11 network? Then you would be able to access it from your personal 802.11 network as well as the Internet. – YLearn Jan 19 '17 at 4:21
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There is a mode called "ad-hoc" which doesn't use an AP, but allows nodes to talk directly to each other. This has been used for mobile networks where topology varies dramatically over short timespans, like seconds.

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