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Router 192.168.0.1 has DHCP enabled. Routers 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 are connected via their LAN ports to router 0.1 by ethernet cable, and have DHCP disabled so that they act as access points. They each have separate SSIDs (the top line in the box for each, Room 1, Room 2, etc). Router 192.168.0.1 distributes IPs in the range 192.168.0.40-254, as the printers/server have fixed IPs in the .30s.

Router Nextbuildingover (top right) is connected to 192.168.0.1 over fibre, through a set of media converters. On the Nextbuildingover router, the ethernet cable from the media converter goes into the WAN port. It has the IP 192.168.1.1, and has DHCP enabled, in the range 192.168.1.100-254

Is the fact the Nextbuildingover router is connected like this correct? Would it be better to connect it via a LAN port, give it the IP 192.168.0.5 and turn off DCHP work better, or does the fact it goes over fibre change things?

Aside from the Nextbuildingover router, are routers 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 set up correctly? I have read conflicting advice, some saying they should have the same SSID, and others saying they need to be set up as bridges.

There are around 30 users across the access points. We frequently need to reset routers/access points to get things working again after the internet connection drops and laptops report 'No internet connection'. I don't know if it is caused by an incorrect setup, or cheap hardware. All hardware is TP Link, of various models.

closed as off-topic by Ron Maupin Feb 5 at 2:15

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "NE is a site for to ask and provide answers about professionally managed networks in a business environment. Your question falls outside the areas our community decided are on topic. Please visit the help center for more details. If you disagree with this closure, please ask on Network Engineering Meta." – Ron Maupin
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • What type of routers are these? For example, you have the same network on two different router interfaces on the 192.168.0.2 router, but routers route between networks, not from a network back to the same network. The router will have no way to determine which interface to send the traffic destined for that network. – Ron Maupin May 24 '17 at 13:22
  • Unfortunately, questions about consumer-grade devices are explicitly off-topic here. You can ask about those for a business network on Server Fault. – Ron Maupin Feb 5 at 2:16
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Is the fact the Nextbuildingover router is connected like this correct?

Yes, it is correct.

Would it be better to connect it via a LAN port, give it the IP 192.168.0.5 and turn off DCHP work better

Sure, you can make it as a single subnet instead of two as long as you are ok with the number of users/broadcasts in it and have no security requirements.

It will not work better per se, but it might be easier for your users to share resources over a single network.

does the fact it goes over fibre change things?

Not much, unless it has some speed limitations.

Aside from the Nextbuildingover router, are routers 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 set up correctly?

Looks ok to me. You did not mention it, you must use different channels on the adjacent access points.

You might also consider to connect meeting room and office switches directly.

I have read conflicting advice, some saying they should have the same SSID, and others saying they need to be set up as bridges.

Same SSID helps mobile users to move between the access points. If your users are static - it does not matter.

We frequently need to reset routers/access points to get things working again after the internet connection drops.

It is hard to guess, you have to track down the issue to its source. Probably you have just one faulty router and you do not have to reset all of them...

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