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There is a wifi network with 5 computers. When one of these computers request a URL from internet, Can ISP know the MAC Address of the computer that made request or phone's IMEI number? Are these informations sent from router to ISP in IP packets?

  • Did any answer help you? If so, you should accept the answer so that the question doesn't keep popping up forever, looking for an answer. Alternatively, you can provide and accept your own answer. – Ron Maupin Feb 19 '18 at 4:58
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A mac address doesn't make it past the first hop (most likely your home router). It stays local to the broadcast network.

IMEI isn't transmitted over wifi, so your ISP will also not see your IMEI. Your cell provider definitely sees it though.

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There is a wifi network with 5 computers. When one of these computers request a URL >from internet, Can ISP know the MAC Address of the computer that made request..

No the ISP will not know the MAC address of the client. MAC adresses are only locally significant. After the first IP hop MAC adresses are swaped/removed by the customer router.

..or phone's IMEI number? Are these informations sent from router to ISP in IP packets?

No. MAC adressess are not sent to the ISP in IP packets. The router swaps the client MAC adress with its own MAC address. The next router does the same it swaps the MAC address with its own.

  • "The router swaps the client MAC adress with its own MAC address." No, that is a myth. The router completely strips off the frame from the packet, and it builds a new frame for the next hop, which may not even be using a protocol that uses MAC addressing. For example, PPP (which is common for WAN) doesn't have any addressing because there are only two endpoints. There is no swap of MAC addressing. – Ron Maupin Mar 19 '19 at 14:27
  • Yes Ron Maupin, I agree with the swap/strip off term. Why insist on explaining MAC adresses in context of ATM or Frame Relay, PPP. Where is the added value by mentioning PPP, when it is written "MAC adresses are only locally significant." This one sentence explains all the WAN techniques without even mentioning what is happening technically. – user54905 Mar 19 '19 at 14:39
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    Only the IEEE LAN protocols use MAC addressing. It is common for things like home networks to use PPP on the WAN (PPPoA is very common for DSL), and many businesses use PPP, HDLC, frame relay, ATM, etc. I think it is useful to understand that traffic from the network to the ISP may not have a MAC address at all. – Ron Maupin Mar 19 '19 at 14:49

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