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I'm trying to route two different networks using static routing, my problem is that I have 10 routers 4 in Lan1, 4 in Lan2 and 2 between Lan1 and Lan2, here is the topology:enter image description here

I'm trying doing something like this:

My routing table for R1:

  • 192.168.90.0 via 192.168.50.2
  • 192.168.91.0 via 192.168.50.2
  • 192.168.92.0 via 192.168.50.2
  • 192.168.59.0 via 192.168.50.2
  • 192.168.58.0 via 192.168.50.2
  • 192.168.57.0 via 192.168.50.2
  • 192.168.56.0 via 192.168.50.2
  • 192.168.10.0 via 192.168.50.2
  • 192.168.20.0 via 192.168.50.2
  • 192.168.30.0 via 192.168.50.2

And I do almost the same for the others routers, what I want to know is if there is an easier way to do this, for example something like this:

R1:

  • R1 -> R3 -> R4 -> R5 -> R6 -> LAN networks

I mean... instead of adding all my networks to my routing table just adding the next router network, or another easier way to do this.

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  • You could aggregate routes but unfortunately, this hasn't been taken into account when designing the network. Why don't you use a dynamic routing protocol?
    – Zac67
    Commented Jun 30, 2017 at 21:35
  • @Zac67 It's mandatory using static routing, so... it's not possible trace one path and then send the routers in that road? What I need to do is adding all the required networks to all my routers? Commented Jun 30, 2017 at 21:38
  • Well, how about using a default route at least for the edge routers? R1 could route 192.168.52.0/24 to 192.168.51.2 and default to 192.168.50.2. This would be much easier if you could supernet the subnets behind R3, those behind R6 and those in the middle. As it is, they're all crossing bit boundaries. Is renumbering an option?
    – Zac67
    Commented Jun 30, 2017 at 21:43
  • Err, dumb question: do you actually need every node to reach any other one? Or just the PCs any to any?
    – Zac67
    Commented Jun 30, 2017 at 22:17
  • 1
    Did any answer help you? If so, you should accept the answer so that the question doesn't keep popping up forever, looking for an answer. Alternatively, you could provide and accept your own answer.
    – Ron Maupin
    Commented Aug 30, 2017 at 0:02

1 Answer 1

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Well, you could at least supernet 192.168.56.0/24, ..57.0/24, ..58.0/24, ..59.0/24 into 192.168.56.0/22.

192.168.50.0/24 through 192.168.53.0/24 would go into 192.168.48/21 (including some collateral damage).

192.168.90.0/24 through 192.168.92.0/24 could go into 192.168.88.0/21 (again, somewhat more).

If you don't require default routes for the Internet, you could use those as shortcuts:

R1: 192.168.52.0/24 -> 192.168.51.2; default -> 192.168.50.2

R2: equivalent

R3: two routes to left subnets, default -> 192.168.90.2

and so on.

Alternatively, you could at least aggregate consecutive even/odd subnets into a single route.

To your question: if you don't mind non-optimal routes you could actually have the edge routers route in a circle by default gateway and only let R3-R6 use educated routes.

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