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I have a small office network that has:

ISP: 100Mbps up / 100Mbps down

Firebox M200 (Firewall/Router) 8 x 1Gbe ports / 3.2Gbps Firewall throughput

Cisco SG200 1Gbe Switch / 26 port

*Planned 10Gbe Switch (not sure what to get yet to replace the existing switch)

3 x Ubiquiti AC Pro WAPS

SUPERMICRO SERVER Dual XEON E5-... 138GB RAM / 72TB Storage RAID-Z2 / 10Gbe SPF card / 4 1Gbe ports

The purpose of getting 10Gbe is to achieve:

  1. Faster throughput from the WAPS to the backup Server

  2. Faster throughput form the LAN to the backup Server

  3. Decongest traffic from WAPS having 6 workstations on each to Internet

  4. Share large files between workstations and from workstation to Server

Question:

  1. a) Would putting each WAP on a 10Gbe port on a switch be faster than putting each WAP on a 1Gbe port on a switch that is connected to the Server via the 10Gbe port on that same switch given that the Unifi UAP-AC-HD has a 5Ghz speed of 1300Mbps?

  2. a) How to get Time Machine traffic to bypass router? b) Do I Trunk multiple VLANS with switch to client computers? c) How would I get Time Machine to only go through the VLAN I setup on the Mac?

  3. a) If I have 6 clients on each of the three Unifi WAPS does having each of those WAPS connected to a separate 10gbe port give me any advantage of decongesting traffic to the internet if the Router/Firewall is only 1Gbe? b) Does it give me any speed boost for backing up to the Server that is connected via 10gbe.

  4. a) How do I get traffic/files that is shared between workstations to bypass the router yet still have those workstations have access to internet. VLANS I'm sure any advice on how that would be setup basically?

Here is how I thought I would setup this network:

Firewall -> 10gbe switch

10Gbe switch a) SFP port to FreeNas server with 10Gbe NIC

10Gbe switch b) Cat6a from 10Gbe-T ports to UNIFI WAPS

10Gbe switch c) 1Gbe ports to the rest of 1Gbe clients/workstations

*WAPS will be moved to 1Gbe ports depending on the feedback I get here. VLANS and Trunking need some figuring out. Any advice please.

  • There is only one 10Gbe switch. The a,b,c labeled in the network setup denote the different pieces of hardware connected to a single 10Gbe. Sorry if that looks confusing. – iheartmacs Jan 23 '18 at 22:35
  • I'm using 10G + FreeNAS + file sharing. While I can't help much and you don't give detailed criteria - on the 10G side I found Netgear's managed ranges surprisingly good in quality, features and price/performance. I use them with Finisar 10SR modules, Chelsio T420s (recommended for FreeNAS) and OM2/OM3 LC SR fibre, works beautifully "out of the box" with FreeNAS and the wider LAN here. The only copper is the 1G Lan. Get a fast Xeon as Samba was (is?) single threaded, 3.5GHz +. Hope that helps. luck! – Stilez Jan 29 '18 at 3:43
  • Wow that was immensely helpful and you really hit the nail on the head for what I wanted to know albeit I didn't say it. – iheartmacs Jan 31 '18 at 2:58
  • Its off topic here but there's software + hardware recommendations stackexchange sites for that. If you ask on those drop a comment here so I see it. – Stilez Jan 31 '18 at 7:12
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The WAPs do not have 10GBASE-T interfaces, so they will not work at that speed. They, apparently have two 1000BASE-T interfaces that could use LAG.

Your questions about consumer-grade devices, e.g. Time Machine, or hosts, servers, applications, and protocols above OSIlayer-4 are off-topic here.

Traffic does not go through a router unless it is destined for a different network. Router route packets between networks, not from a network back to the same network. Switches and WAPs bridge traffic on the same network.

  • Ok for some reason I thought that all traffic goes through the router. Ok thank you. – iheartmacs Jan 24 '18 at 0:58
  • @iheartmacs you should accept the answer if it helped you. :-) – user36472 Jan 24 '18 at 6:44

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