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I'm trying to wrap my head around the path the packets take on the internet.

I know that they hop between multiple routers until they get to their destination, but are these routers only in ISP's buildings, universities, etc. Or can they be any router around the world?

So would the router for my house be used as one of the many routers on the internet or would that be too dangerous?

I hope the question makes sense. Thank you.

marked as duplicate by Zac67, user36472, Ron Maupin Apr 22 '18 at 16:33

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  • Sorry, home networking and general Internet traffic (a network not under your control) are explicitly off-topic here. But rest assured, your router is only used by your traffic. – Zac67 Apr 22 '18 at 16:15
  • Packets only traverse Internet backbones hosted by commercial, government, academic and other high-capacity network centers. The Internet exchange points and network access points, that exchange Internet traffic between countries, continents and across the oceans only route your packet, if it needs to go outside your country. Internet service providers, often Tier 1 networks, participate in Internet backbone traffic by privately negotiated interconnection agreements, primarily governed by the principle of settlement-free peering. – user36472 Apr 22 '18 at 16:20
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Packets only traverse Internet backbones hosted by commercial, government, academic and other high-capacity network centers.

The Internet exchange points and network access points, that exchange Internet traffic between countries, continents and across the oceans only route your packet, if it needs to go outside your country.

Internet service providers, often Tier 1 networks, participate in Internet backbone traffic by privately negotiated interconnection agreements, primarily governed by the principle of settlement-free peering.

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