5

A Cisco GLC-T Ethernet SFP Module with yellow springing mechanism

Some Ethernet SFP modules have them, some do not. What is the yellow springing mechanism and the attached metal wire meant for?

8

Some Ethernet SFP modules have them, some do not. What is the yellow springing mechanism and the attached metal wire meant for?

Every SFP I have ever seen or used has some sort of mechanism for securing the transceiver into the SFP slot on a device. In the example provided by the OP, this is a spring mechanism that manipulates the catch and releases the SFP. This is a feature of SFP to secure them to the device to prevent accidental disconnections.

Other types of SFPs use different mechanisms that perform the same function, but you will always find the catch on the bottom of the transceiver (look for a small protrusion in the center of the SFP 1 3/4 inches from the end inserted into the device).

Some will use some sort of spring action when the handle is pulled (whether it pivots down or is some sort of plastic cable support extension). Others will manipulate the catch itself when the handle is pivoted down or have some sort of other mechanical action to release the catch.

I took a couple of quick pictures showing the tops and bottoms of some SFPs I had sitting around. I marked the catches with red circles and the location of the handle or other mechanism a user will manipulate to release the catch with blue ovals. Hopefully this will help illustrate some of the ways that this works on SFPs.

enter image description here

enter image description here

6

It releases the retaining clip. (the tiny black bit) The wire is the pull bar.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.