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In the Internet some times, we hear of the term "geometry of the network": https://bit.ly/2VqI2YO

Is there any difference between the term of "geometry of the network" and "topology of the network"?

In other words, when I see the term of "geometry of the network" in the above links, we must consider this term as "topology of the network"? Or it means differently?

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    Most of the time "network geometry" doesn't make too much sense. You build networks as a bus, in stars, trees, rings but these are topologies. Above the actual topology you might use "architecture" for a more abstract scope. – Zac67 Feb 27 at 10:59
  • @Zac67 you should post that as an answer. – user36472 Feb 27 at 13:11
  • I edited my question. – Questioner Feb 27 at 13:14
  • I suppose things like a spanning tree diameter could be referred to as the geometry. – Ron Maupin Feb 27 at 14:53
  • @RonMaupin I was thinking along the same lines ("bisection bandwidth", ...) but I wouldn't call that "geometry". – Zac67 Feb 27 at 15:56
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Converted from comment

Most of the time, "network geometry" doesn't make too much sense. You build networks as a bus, in stars, trees, rings but these are topologies. Above the actual topology you might use "architecture" for a more abstract scope.

The links you've given provide very abstract views on networking concepts. I'm not at all sure in how far they are of practical use.

While there are somewhat geometric views in networking including "network diameter", "tree depth", "bisection bandwidth", these views help you handle the complexity of a larger network better, identify potential bottlenecks or breaking points before they happen.

However, when designing a network you don't start with geometric considerations. You start with a proven, best practice topology and adapt that to your current needs.

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    Not disagreeing with a word of this, just adding that if I heard "network geometry" I'd expect a statement like "there are 3 sites, each with about 200 desk-bound worker hosts, about 100 km apart, and site 3 also has 50 servers, and site 3 is a long thin warehouse 500 metres long." These measurements drive us to topologies. – jonathanjo Feb 27 at 21:16
  • @jonathanjo Another possibility. I'm not sure if the OP refers to that though - if he has something specific in his mind. – Zac67 Feb 27 at 22:43

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