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I have a homework where I have to "implement RADIUS" and use nmap and wireshark to verify it's working and see how are the PDUs that are circulating. The problem is I've been reading about RADIUS and RADIUSFree server and stuff, but every implementation says you need an AP that supports RADIUS to use it. I don't have an AP, and my ISP's router doesn't have a WPA-Enterprise configuration.

Can I implement RADIUS in a way that I don't need that, or I can use my android smartphone as an AP? (though I don't think it supports RADIUS). Is there a way that I can experiment with RADIUS in a "real" setup (not PacketTracer simulation) without the need of extra hardware?

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  • Homework and test questions are off limits here, as are questions about home-grade equipment and personal electronics (such as Android smartphones). You may ask your question on Super User instead. – Jesse P. Jul 2 '19 at 3:00
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The problem is I've been reading about RADIUS and RADIUSFree server and stuff, but every implementation says you need an AP that supports RADIUS to use it.

You must be misinterpreting what you are reading or looking at bad sources of information.

RADIUS is entirely independent of 802.11 wireless. 802.11 wireless can make use of it for authentication, but RADIUS has been around far longer than 802.11 as it was used back when Internet was dialup for managing accounts and activity.

Is there a way that I can experiment with RADIUS in a "real" setup (not PacketTracer simulation) without the need of extra hardware?

Just because the most common use of RADIUS today is 802.11 authentications, doesn't make it the only use nor does it mean you must run a wireless environment to install, configure and run a RADIUS server.

All you need is a server (i.e. computer or VM) to run it on. You may even be able to run it on the same computer you are running Wireshark.

I don't know why it asks for the layers the protocol works on, and then it says "explain why does it work on that protocol" instead of layers. Don't know if it's an error or there's something I don't understand.

This is one of the exact reasons homework questions are off topic here. We could only guess at what your instructor actually wants from you and if our guess is wrong, you could fail to provide the answers your instructor is looking to see. Or it could be a question that is testing your understanding of the concepts. Either way, it would be best if you asked your instructor what is meant.

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The FreeRADIUS package includes a test client (radtest) that can be used to validate any RADIUS server. There are certainly other test clients out there, but this one is pretty handy/readily available.

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  • so i could have a VM running the server and a client in my host, and I could use nmap and wireshark to test the connection in the host and see the traffic? :O – sbstnssndn Jul 2 '19 at 1:30
  • Nmap will confirm that the various RADIUS ports are open. Wireshark will observe the traffic on the wire. A VM with a test RADIUS client will create the traffic to be observed. – rnxrx Jul 2 '19 at 1:33
  • Great, thanks! I'll try that. – sbstnssndn Jul 2 '19 at 1:34
  • RADIUS is just a protocol. If a toaster implements if for giving toasts, it will work. – Rui F Ribeiro Jul 4 '19 at 21:46
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A simple google search of "OSI model and it's protocols" in google images will give you a a lot of graphics/tables showing where each protocol falls on the layer.

Analyzing a packet in Wireshark will show you from the top to the bottom the different PDU layers and how each protocols fall within those PDUs.

The function of the protocols defines their placement within the OSI model. you can describe how FTP, SNMP, and HTTP are "software" protocols where as the physical layer (IEEE 802.3 and Fiber are "physical" protocols.

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  • Yeah, that I understand. What I didn't understand is why he talked about layers and then about protocols but in the same context. I guess it was just an error. Thanks. – sbstnssndn Jul 2 '19 at 2:27

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