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I want to segregate flows at a router. I can do this by using the destination IP on the header. I also want to make sure that my router does not forward any other packet for the time being I am sure the transmission was successful(I know the average time it takes to the destination). How do I buffer packets at the router for that estimated time?

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  • Routers route one packet at a time, as fast as possible, without regard to any packets that have come before. A router has no idea about a higher-layer (e.g. TCP) flow. It simply sees a packet and switches it based on the destination address. it does not maintain a state for IP (IP is specifically a stateless protocol). That allows IP to be rerouted anywhere in the path if there is a problem with a path. That is the original design of IP; packets can be rerouted in the event of a disaster, and only each end maintains the state of the communication.
    – Ron Maupin
    Feb 19 '20 at 17:43
  • Did any answer help you? If so, you should accept the answer so that the question doesn't keep popping up forever, looking for an answer. Alternatively, you can post and accept your own answer.
    – Ron Maupin
    Dec 17 '20 at 15:42
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I want to segregate flows at a router. I can do this by using the destination IP on the header.

Forwarding by destination IP is what routing is about.

I also want to make sure that my router does not forward any other packet for the time being I am sure the transmission was successful(I know the average time it takes to the destination).

A router doesn't do that. When a packet has been forwarded the router forgets all about it. IP is a stateless network protocol and routers are equally stateless.

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  • True but QoS would probably solve the actual problem which I am sure is not what the question states :) Feb 29 '20 at 1:29

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