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I used to think the Internet looks like a tree, with some extra edges for redundancy. And that the subnets are getting shorter and shorter as you go up towards the backbones, the roots of the "tree".

For example I thought that if I send a packet from 12.34.56.78 to 90.91.92.93, the path would roughly look something like:

 1. 12.34.56.78
 2. 12.34.56.??
 3. 12.34.??.??
 4. 12.??.??.??
 5. 90.??.??.??
 6. 90.91.??.??
 7. 90.91.92.??
 8. 90.91.92.93

Or something roughly similar.

But I just traceroute to 8.8.8.8, and here's what I got:

  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  10.0.0.138   (my home router)
  2     9 ms     8 ms     8 ms  212.XX.XX.XX
  3     7 ms     8 ms     6 ms  10.XX.XX.XX
  4     7 ms     7 ms     7 ms  212.XX.XX.XX
  5     7 ms     7 ms     7 ms  192.XX.XX.XX    (this is not 192.168.. )
  6     7 ms     6 ms     6 ms  10.XX.XX.XX
  7    45 ms    45 ms    44 ms  74.125.51.88
  8    46 ms    46 ms    46 ms  108.170.252.225
  9    46 ms    46 ms    45 ms  66.249.94.127
 10    45 ms    44 ms    44 ms  8.8.8.8

Sorry about the censorship.

I guess all the 10.* are some internal private networks? But what about the rest? It seems completely random.

So how are the IPs arranged? I don't get it. How the routing works in real life?

Thanks!

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    The public Internet is very decentalized, and any company can peer with any other company. The addressing is assigned, but one company with certain addressing can peer with another company with very different addressing. See this answer for a more complete explanation. – Ron Maupin Jul 20 '20 at 2:29
  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Ron Maupin Jul 20 '20 at 21:14
  • hmm... the multiple appearance of 10.0.0.0/8 networks after going into public networks (hop 2) is quite interesting. Are you sure you haven't censored / messed with the traceroute results more than you should? – Elias Bats Jul 22 '20 at 10:19

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