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I am trying to find out the thoroughput of our Cisco 2960 & SG300 switches. Is there a CLI code I can run to find this?

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  • You can look at the interface statistics and infer it from the number of packets sent/received
    – Ron Trunk
    Sep 21 '20 at 13:56
  • Is there CLI code that I can run to find the statistics?
    – Jackie
    Sep 21 '20 at 13:59
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    Are you looking for the official PPS (Packets Per Second) rate for the switch models? If so, you will need the exact models, not just the series.
    – Jesse P.
    Sep 21 '20 at 14:01
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    show interface <x>
    – Ron Trunk
    Sep 21 '20 at 14:02
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    Modern, enterprise-grade switches operate at wirespeed. If you want to measure what is actually flowing through the switch during a specific time period, you need to set up something like NetFlow, then you can create reports about that.
    – Ron Maupin
    Sep 21 '20 at 16:23
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No.

Measure throughput can be done in several ways.

The one I prefer is to connect:

PC with Linux - Switch - PC with Linux

And then use the cli command iperf, see https://iperf.fr/iperf-doc.php.

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    That is not an accurate way to measure the switch throughput. What you are really measuring is the host throughput and processing time. A modern, enterprise-grade switch will operate at wirespeed. Also, multiple hosts operating on a switch will be competing with each other for interfaces, such as the uplink to distribution interface.
    – Ron Maupin
    Sep 21 '20 at 16:22
  • @RonMaupin I really like people that answer, this is wrong without answering whats right Sep 21 '20 at 18:40
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    The switch will handle any throughput, per interface, up to wirespeed. The overall throughput of the switch (which cannot be measured by what you have) depends on the backplane speed. Look at my comment on the question, where I explain that something like NetFlow is needed to see the actual throughput during a specific time period. Remember that a switch will have many interfaces, and the limiting factor there is the backplane speed because the switch can run at full interface speed between just two interfaces, but performance on many is based on the backplane.
    – Ron Maupin
    Sep 21 '20 at 18:46
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    For example, if you have a switch with 24 1 Gbps interfaces, the switch can send 1 Gbps from through it from one interface to another, as you have pictured. If the backplane is 24 Gbps, then it can do that for all the interfaces, but if the backplane is 12 Gbps, then it can only do that for half the interfaces. Your measure will be completely affected by the throughput of the hosts if you only have two hosts. The switch backplane throughput will be much faster than any two switch interfaces.
    – Ron Maupin
    Sep 21 '20 at 18:55
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    Remember that modern switching is done in hardware, which is why it can reach wirespeed. The old days of software bridges (or what PCs do for bridging today) are over. Switches have CAM and TCAM, that PCs do not, to be able to do single-cycle table lookups.
    – Ron Maupin
    Sep 21 '20 at 18:58

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