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Taking into account this diagram... enter image description here

I wonder if a device, after a reboot having a previous known configuration, uses it from the start even tho it's still asking to check if it can continue using that configuration...or not.

I mean, at the very start after a reboot, will the device maintain the configuration or not? The device needs to ask the DHCP server if it can maintain that configuration or not, but in that process, it needs to have a configuration right?

Also, in the rebooting process, the different Times are also taken into account? (T1, T2, T3). I'm guessiing that after a reboot the device enters automatically into T1, because it's asking, but if that specific DHCP server won't ask...will it enter T2 and make a broadcast request to any DHCP server in that network? And if nobody answers will it reach T3 and become unconfigured?

Basically, what I'm trying to understand is that if during the rebooting process, the above process it's still being done (requesting, renewing, rebinding...etc etc). Also, if after a reboot you maintain the configuration or not (despite the fact that you need to ask the DHCP if you can keep it or not).

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  • Unfortunately, questions about host/server configurations and protocols above OSI layer-4 are off-topic here. You could try to ask this question on Server Fault for a business network. – Ron Maupin Oct 2 '20 at 13:52
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I wonder if a device, after a reboot having a previous known configuration, uses it from the start even tho it's still asking to check if it can continue using that configuration...or not.

Your chart actually shows that: on reboot, the client issues a DHCP request and only after DHCPACK does it bind that known address.

I mean, at the very start after a reboot, will the device maintain the configuration or not?

The client remembers its previous address and re-requests it but it cannot use/bind it before ACK.

A discovering or re-requesting DHCP client uses only broadcasts from 0.0.0.0 to communicate with the DHCP server - as obviously, it doesn't yet have a valid IP address.

That chart shows the DHCP client states (as a finite state machine) as bubbles and the state transition requirements on the arrows. Tx are timers that are used to enable aborting an unsuccessful transition and to ensure the lease time isn't exceeded.

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