2

If using dual pair LC fiber to run 10GbE over a long distance, what's the best way to connect it to a server on one end which has a 10GBASE-T port?

On the other end there's a switch with 10G SFP+ ports so I assume that's just buying the appropriate transceiver, but I tried searching and it wasn't clear what device(s) should be purchased on the 10GBASE-T end to convert.

  • 1
    10GBASE-T uses copper UTP (limited to 100 meters with the correct cable), not fiber. You probably want to get a server NIC with SFP+ slots. – Ron Maupin Oct 23 at 17:33
  • Was hoping to convert the LC fiber to a 10GBASE-T connector at the server via some sort of transceiver rather than having to replace the card, though replacing the card as you mentioned would be a good solution of course. @RonMaupin – g491 Oct 23 at 17:54
  • 2
    Using a media converter adds a point of common failures, as it needs to be powered, and there is no monitoring. After years of problems, the company I work for has banned those things. I have never seen one for 10 Gbps ethernet, but that does not mean they do not exist. Product recommendations are explicitly off-topic, except on Software Recommendations and Hardware Recommendations. – Ron Maupin Oct 23 at 17:59
  • Thanks @RonMaupin - yeah wasn't looking for a specific product rec, just in concept – g491 Oct 23 at 18:00
  • 4
    A decent media converter is likely to cost as much as a server NIC which is a much better solution. – Zac67 Oct 23 at 18:36
6

If using dual pair LC fiber to run 10GbE over a long distance, what's the best way to connect it to a server on one end which has a 10GBASE-T port?

The best way is to get a server NIC with SFP+ slots so that you can get a 10 Gbps fiber transceiver to match your fiber.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    To add to this, Intel chipset NIC cards are compatible with everything and offer SFP+ slots. I use some in my lab. They're inexpensive and trouble-free. – Jeff Wheeler Oct 23 at 21:15
-2

The best and cost solution is to buy a media converter which support 10G SFP+ and buy a cat7 network cable to connect 10Gbase-T and media converter, and a pair of SFP+ to connect media converter to the other end.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    No, this is pretty much the worst solution. It adds 2 unneeded devices that are unmanageable, requiring additional power supplies, introducing more points of failure, taking up more spaces and this will be more expensive that doing the correct thing (adding SFP+ card in the server). – JFL Nov 4 at 8:21
  • 2
    ... and an unmanaged media converter potentially hides link failures from the server. ;-) – Zac67 Nov 4 at 8:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.