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I am quite new to this world and I'm currently to understand why an ICMP ping is always sent to the same PC.

enter image description here

In this case, I am sending a ping from PC_F to Server PT. ping 192.168.1.2 In the simulation, the message goes always to PC_C, which IP is 192.168.3.2 Looking in more detail on Router 2, the static routing shows:

  • 192.168.5.0/24 via 192.168.0.10
  • 192.168.6.0/24 via 192.168.0.10
  • 192.168.1.0/24 via 192.168.3.2

At the moment Network #5 and #6 are not connected, but they will.

I am not sure if the static routing should be the following:

  • 192.168.10 / 255.255.255.0 / 192.168.0.0 (to server)
  • 192.168.5.0/ 255.255.255.0 / 192.168.0.8 (to network #5)
  • 192.168.6.0/ 255.255.255.0 / 192.168.0.8 (to network #6)

Am I missing the routes to Network #2, #3 and #4?

Here I add a table to sum up the IPs, Masks, GW and VLAN:

enter image description here

Thank you for your suggestions/corrections.

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192.168.1.0/24 via 192.168.3.2

That's why. Router 2 uses 192.168.3.2 as a gateway to 192.168.1.0/24, including 192.168.1.2. The router doesn't know (nor care) that there's no gateway behind that IP address.

Instead, Router 2's gateway towards 192.168.1.0/24 needs to point to Router 1's IP address on Gig9/0.

Router 1 requires routes to networks #2-#4 (and possibly #9), Router 2 requires routes to networks #1, #5, #6, #8, and Router 3 requires routes to #1-#4, #7.

Generally, a router needs routes to all networks but the ones connected directly. These routes can be set up statically by the admin or learned dynamically via a routing protocol between the routers.

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