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We know the baseband line at one time send or receive data(half duplex). If more than one host send data at same time may occur collision. In bus topology see the same thing. Inspite this in home, college, university uses this lan technologies. But there doesn't occurred any collision and they did multiple task parallelly. My question is that what is the actual reason to not occurred collision after using LAN(ring topology) in (home, college, university)?

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    Modern ethernet uses switching on UTP (different send and receive paths) for full duplex. It is still baseband. We no longer have shared coax that has the same send and receive path (collisions). You still get collisions on Wi-Fi because it uses a shared medium, but a host cannot detect the collisions, so it uses CSMA/CA to try to avoid collisions instead of CSMA/CD to detect collisions.
    – Ron Maupin
    Aug 17 at 11:01
  • @Ron Maupin could modern Ethernet use statistical TDM to avoid collision?
    – Alok Maity
    Aug 17 at 11:45
  • No. It simply has separate send and receive paths on dedicated, switched links so that there are no collisions.
    – Ron Maupin
    Aug 17 at 11:46
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    Yes, of course. Basically, baseband means that the signal uses the entire bandwidth of the path, while broadband uses a portion so that there can be simultaneous signals that do not interfere with each other (like cable television).
    – Ron Maupin
    Aug 17 at 11:53
  • @Ron Maupin thank you
    – Alok Maity
    Aug 17 at 11:57
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Baseband is a 'plain' signaling method (in contrast to using one or more carrier frequencies), entirely unrelated to the access method in a network.

What you're referring to is CSMA/CD used with early Ethernet. CSMA/CD is practically extinct with micro-segmented, fully-switched networks utilizing full duplex being the norm (due to switches having supplanted primitive repeater hubs, or even the early shared-wire technology used with coax). There are no collisions on full-duplex links.

Ethernet generally uses a star or tree (=multi-star) topology. Rings or chains should generally be avoided for performance and reliability reasons.

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  • we mean to say college, university presently buses star or tree (=multi-star) topology and nowadays bus topology is obsolete..
    – Alok Maity
    Aug 16 at 18:55

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