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If i use IP options to send secret messages outside of the network using for example EIP, will the router replace them before sending out to the internet?

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  • How is that secret when it is in the packet header for anyone to see? The options must follow a specific format, you cannot just put anything in the extra 40 header bytes.
    – Ron Maupin
    Sep 5 '21 at 14:34
  • Did any answer help you? if so, you should accept the answer so that the question does not keep popping up forever, looking for an answer. Alternatively, you could post and accept your own answer.
    – Ron Maupin
    Dec 23 '21 at 21:48
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If i use IP options to send secret messages outside of the network using for example EIP, will the router replace them before sending out to the internet?

A basic router doesn't but an Internet gateway might. If it doesn't many options might get ignored (or deleted) on the Internet anyway (or the whole packet dropped).

Note that EIP (originating from when classful network was still a thing) was officially deprecated in 2012 by RFC 6814 - it was defunct more than a decade before that.

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Does this answer the question?

The Physical Layer EtherNet/IP uses the standard IEEE 802.3 model at the Physical and Data Link Layers.

The Network and Transport LayersThe Network and Transport Layers use TCP/IP Suite to send messages between one or more devices. At these layers, messages used by all CIP networks are encapsulated.

TCP/IP encapsulation allows a node on the network to embed a message as the data portion in an Ethernet message. The encapsulation technique uses both the TCP and UDP layers of the TCP/IP suite and provides the method that allows CIP to be implemented transparently on top of Ethernet and TCP/IP.

Source:

https://scadahacker.com/library/Documents/ICS_Protocols/Intro%20to%20EthernetIP%20Technology.pdf

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