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I don’t quite understand what exactly WI-FI is (regarding to the computer network theory). There are many different definitions of this term. Somewhere it's written that it's a wireless LAN technology, somewhere it's a wireless LAN protocol, and somewhere it's a wireless LAN itself.

And secondly, there're many different LAN technologies: Blutooth, NFC... What exactly defines WI-FI among these ones? IEEE 802.11? Router, modem?

And one more question: if WI-FI is a wireless LAN technology/protocol, then why is WI-FI accessing to the Internet (WAN)? As far as I understand, local network doesn't have access to the global network. All information exchange happens within the local network, not beyond its borders. Or now "local" and "global" terms become something vague?

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Wi-Fi is a trademark of the Wi-Fi alliance. They define what the different types of Wi-Fi mean. But it has also become a common term for general wireless networking. So as commonly used, it's a bit of a vague term.

I think it is safe to say that for any equipment or technology that is based on the 802.11 protocols, would generally be considered Wi-Fi. That distinguishes it from other wireless technologies such as Bluetooth, etc.

if WI-FI is a wireless LAN technology/protocol, then why is WI-FI accessing to the Internet (WAN)?

I'm not sure I understand your question. Wi-Fi as generally used, means a wireless LAN technology.

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