0

I was reading one of 5G standards specifying signalling transport https://www.etsi.org/deliver/etsi_ts/138400_138499/138472/15.06.00_60/ts_138472v150600p.pdf and noticed (section 6):

The IP layer of F1-C only supports point-to-point transmission for delivering F1AP message

Does this mean that the underlying link for delivering these F1AP messages can't be shared by any nodes except the two participating in transmission, e.g. A <-> B? In other words we can't expect to have a switch or router in between A and B which would attempt to forward/intercept these messages to other nodes connected to switch/router. Is that an assumption?

3
  • Switches are transparent devices that do not get involved with IP. You could have a point-to-point IP connection between two devices with a switch between them.
    – Ron Maupin
    Feb 2, 2022 at 23:35
  • But if it is L3 switch (aka router?), theoretically it could mangle packets and redirect them to other ports. In such a case, it would not be p-to-p link anymore? I feel that point-to-point simply is equivalent to unicast.
    – Mark
    Feb 3, 2022 at 0:30
  • A layer-3 switch is first a layer-2 switch. An IP point-to-point link will connect on the same layer-3 network, not passing through a layer-3 (SVI) interface on a layer-3 switch, only using layer-2 on the switch.
    – Ron Maupin
    Feb 3, 2022 at 0:34

1 Answer 1

2

Does this mean that the underlying link for delivering these F1AP messages can't be shared by any nodes except the two participating in transmission, e.g. A <-> B? In other words we can't expect to have a switch or router in between A and B which would attempt to forward/intercept these messages to other nodes connected to switch/router. Is that an assumption?

No. Point-to-Point simply means it is a one-to-one relation, regardless of routing and switches.

Point-to-Point traffic can still be intercepted.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.