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I am creating a network diagram for my local LAN. I would like to include a patch panel diagramming what physical location (office) each port goes to, as well as the devices in that office. I have attached what I have created below, but I am unsure that this is the best way to do this.

What is the correct way to diagram physical locations that a patch panel goes to within a Network Diagram?

Patch Panel

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    What you have is actually pretty elaborate. If anything, you could probably answer this with what you do as a reference for others to mimic. – Ryan Foley May 12 '14 at 17:17
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    I like that, but would never take the time to draw it. :-) I just keep a spreadsheet of what's what. – Ricky Beam May 12 '14 at 18:53
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    Very nice diagram. I see multiple hosts downstream of patch ports 10 & 12; are those on unmanaged switches? If so, perhaps it's time to rethink that approach. As for improvements to the diagram, I honestly think you're juxtaposing the content of this diagram with what is traditionally reserved for cable labels. Cable labels normally have information about the attached host. – Mike Pennington May 13 '14 at 7:01
  • Thanks @MikePennington. At the risk of exposing how much I may or may not know what I am doing, why is having a dumb switch downstream of a managed switch not best practice? In this example, there is only one Ethernet port in an office shared by 4 people. What would the best practice way to handle this be (without running 3 more cables)? To replace it with a managed switch? – Mondrianaire May 13 '14 at 18:44
  • As for your comment on the direct question, I tend to agree. I didn't run the cable in the office, and whoever did left absolutely no documentation. I remember seeing floor plans in the past of other sites where they had diagrammed the patch panel numbers, that had seemed to be the easiest place for that sort of physical documentation. – Mondrianaire May 13 '14 at 19:01
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Typically you diagram network connections, and then make good use of labeling the physical patch panel and cables. The reason for this is patch panels are only a physical pass through, If you are troubleshooting at that point, then you should be looking at it in person.

Here is a good link for some network diagrams link

I would diagram out the network from a layer2/3 perspective and go through the patch panels and physically label everything including the patch panel and the cables.

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