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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 20201

Questions relating to the operations of ISPs and interacting with them.

1
vote
It all depends on how your ISP presents those 5 IPs. There are multiple ways an ISP can present IPs to you over an Ethernet or Ethernet-like interface. They can route the IPs to the interface …
answered Aug 6 '18 by Peter Green
6
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includes ISPs but also other major networks) can be split into two main catogories (there are also intermediate cases). In a "transit" connection a customer AS pays a provider ISP for routes to the …
answered Sep 11 '18 by Peter Green
0
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An ISP has basically 3 options. Buy transit locally in their country. Build their network out into other countries and establish peering and/or transit there. Buy a link to a transit provider or …
answered Sep 12 '18 by Peter Green
4
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I have trying to get a better mental big-picture of how the internet works I stumbled across the Wikipedia article about Tier 1 networks that really helped build my picture. This lead to Wikipedia' …
answered Dec 13 '15 by Peter Green
1
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There are basically two approaches. One is to make each datacenter (or cluster of datacenters) a separate "network" with it's own IP space (which may be either allocated by a provider or provider ind …
answered Dec 13 '15 by Peter Green
2
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The problem is that your router doesn't know why the traffic is coming in slowly. Maybe your ISP is flaking out, maybe the server is slow, maybe that particular data stream just doesn't have very …
answered Oct 1 '17 by Peter Green
7
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What it does is simplify your network administration, particularly for large high-traffic networks. Running dual stack means administering two seperate IP allocations for every network. Running IPv6 …
answered Jul 12 by Peter Green
0
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This sort of thing is possible but not easy in the general case. The first problem is how to split traffic. If the provider of "special services". If the destination IP addresses for the "special ser …
answered Apr 24 '17 by Peter Green
0
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devices. Most likely your ISP will simply block the packet based on either reverse path filtering or an explicit block on private IP addresses. If they don't block it then likely someone else along the … to obtain a successful echo reply ping? Either enable some form of NAT or use legitimately aquired public IPs on your internal LAN and arrange for your ISP to route them to your gateway. …
answered May 23 '16 by Peter Green