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For questions about network speed. Like bandwidth this tag is suitable when your question is about network congestion, speed, throughput and of course low bandwidth/speed problems.

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I'm confused as to how more data comes through the connection to the client based on their connection speed. …
answered Dec 12 '20 by Peter Green
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You should only use manual speed/duplex if you have problems with autonegotiation and if you do use it you should use it on both ends of the link. …
answered May 31 '17 by Peter Green
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If C sends packets as fast as he can both links will be filled, but only half the packets will reach H, the other half will be dropped by the router. On the other hand if C runs a protocol like TCP t …
answered Oct 24 '16 by Peter Green
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This lowers the speed of your network to the slowest device on the segment. Afaik with a pure hub a device will either link at the speed the hub is set up for or not link at all. … The dual speed hub then negotiates speed on each port and connects it to the appropriate logical hub. At the time This was cheaper to implement than a full switch. …
answered May 31 '17 by Peter Green
2
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It rather depends on what exactly the "problems" are. If the problem is that the customers port doesn't support 10 Mbps (uncommon right now but may well get more common in the future) then a simple E …
answered Sep 22 '16 by Peter Green
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It's really down to the individual providers. Residential links are often shared at the pysical layer (PON), datacenter links are usually point to point. So that's a point in favor of the datacenter. …
answered Apr 22 '16 by Peter Green
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It depends. In an otherwise idle network it depends on whether the switching devices are "store and forward" or "cut through". If the switching devices are store and forward then faster links will me …
answered Jan 4 '16 by Peter Green
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Others believe that not taking the fiber all the way is a false economy that will result in expensive re-engineering as the demand for speed rises. …
answered Jun 6 '19 by Peter Green
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Not really. Firstly "Latency between AS's" doesn't really make much sense as a concept. Many AS's span the globe. The latency between two geographically close points in dfferent AS's can easilly be f …
answered Feb 25 '16 by Peter Green
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There are two aspects to speed, data rate (often called bandwidth though that is confusing) and latency. …
answered Aug 5 '16 by Peter Green