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For questions about network speed. Like bandwidth this tag is suitable when your question is about network congestion, speed, throughput and of course low bandwidth/speed problems.

2
votes
The NIC knows what kind of physical interface it has (fiber, copper), and it knows its interface speed (line rate). …
answered Dec 8 '20 by Ron Trunk
1
vote
OC-3 (and all the others) refers to the specifications for transmission of data over SONET. It was designed for long-haul, point-to-point connections. It's a completely different technology (circuit …
answered Aug 30 '19 by Ron Trunk
1
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Some switches are designed to process every port at wire speed, but others will oversubscribe the backplane to save money. …
answered Aug 21 '18 by Ron Trunk
3
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The port speed has nothing to do with the forwarding rate (how fast the switch can forward data from one interface to another). … This can be significantly slower than the port speed, especially on lower end switches. Many (most) switches autonegotiate the port speed, and can reduce to 100Mb. …
answered Aug 13 '18 by Ron Trunk
0
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If the slowest link between the source and destination is 100Mb (for example), then the transfer speed is 1E10*8/1E8, or 800 secs (ignoring overhead). …
answered Nov 8 '19 by Ron Trunk
1
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Propagation speed - the speed which electrons flow through a copper cable - is about 0.6c. Flow rate is a vague term. Perhaps you mean data rate or clock rate. …
answered Jan 3 '21 by Ron Trunk
3
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Is this theoretically correct? Yes, given your simplistic assumptions. How does it change considering TCP and HTTP headers? Using TCP will drastically reduce your throughput. Remember that …
answered Feb 4 '19 by Ron Trunk
1
vote
Have you adjusted your access points to limit low-speed clients? If one client is far away and connects at a low speed, it slows everyone else down too. …
answered Jul 2 '19 by Ron Trunk
2
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So divide 8 Gb by the download speed to get an approximate transfer time. …
answered May 28 '20 by Ron Trunk
7
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UDP by itself isn't reliable. The data acknowledge/retransmission functions have to occur at a higher (i.e. application) level. TFTP is a good example of that.
answered Feb 20 '15 by Ron Trunk
2
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Here's a strategy: Start by capturing a web session with Wireshark when the response is slow. Are you seeing timeouts/retransmissions? If you see retransmissions, then you are losing packets somew …
answered Jan 27 '16 by Ron Trunk
5
votes
Full-duplex data transmission means that data can be transmitted in both directions on a signal carrier at the same time. That is incorrect. It means devices can transmit and receive at the same …
answered Jan 17 '20 by Ron Trunk
7
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In other words, they may have 1Gb ports, but be unable to forward traffic at anywhere near that speed (I should also mention that consumer-grade equipment is off topic on this forum). …
answered Nov 21 '17 by Ron Trunk
3
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Tools like Ookla Speedtest report download and upload speed. "Speed" is a term that's often misused. All these tools measure throughput -- the amount of data sent in a given amount of time. …
answered Oct 19 '20 by Ron Trunk