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For questions about network speed. Like bandwidth this tag is suitable when your question is about network congestion, speed, throughput and of course low bandwidth/speed problems.

2
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Link speed is either implied by the type/module or negotiated. That speed is used for all data sent over the link. The link speed is sometimes called raw bandwidth. … Effectively, that server could serve 178,000 such clients at their full speed simultaneously (provided there are no bottlenecks). How does a NIC know how much data to send? …
answered Dec 8 '20 by Zac67
1
vote
You can't "upgrade" hardware by installing another driver. You'll need to buy another NIC for the PC card slot or for USB.
answered Oct 14 '17 by Zac67
2
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(With the possible exception of large, chassis switches with very high-speed ports.) … In your example, you should be able to run the full port speed across any pairs you want simultaneously - 12x 1 Gbit/s in duplex. Check the switch specifications for details. …
answered Aug 21 '18 by Zac67
2
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Which component(s) defines this speed? Is it the switch core? … Is it possible to decrease the speed to < xGbits? Downward-compatible ports negotiate speed automatically to the highest mutually supported speed. …
answered Aug 13 '18 by Zac67
0
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If you just look at the network, leaving out all other factors (source and destination hardware and software limitations, overhead on intermediate devices/routers, ...), there are essentially two fact …
answered Nov 9 '19 by Zac67
1
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A reported upstream attenuation of "0.0 dB" most probably means that the DSLAM does not report this figure back to the modem. 0 dB is technically not possible. As has already been pointed out the dow …
answered Mar 6 '18 by Zac67
1
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No. A server cannot become faster when you upgrade its link alone (if the link isn't the bottleneck). The possible throughput is the lower value of local throughput and network throughput.
answered Nov 8 '20 by Zac67
1
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Ethernet's nominal speed is what's used at the top of the physical layer - it includes all common signaling like the preamble, start-of-frame (SOF), and inter-packet gap (IPG) but excludes the actual line … The bits that are actually on the wire depend on the signaling rate and the propagation speed of the wire. …
answered Jan 3 '21 by Zac67
1
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High latency directly impacts throughput when the TCP send window doesn't scale up to what is required to "fill the pipe": bandwidth * RTT (the delay-bandwidth product). That very quickly requires the …
answered Dec 3 '20 by Zac67
3
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However, TCP's congestion control kicks in and the sender adapts the stream speed that's exceeding link and buffer capacities, so after a short while retransmissions become rare. …
answered Feb 10 '18 by Zac67
3
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You're not very clear on how the access points are connected. If it's wireless (bridged) ignore this. Assuming a wired Ethernet connection and chained WAPs, there's obviously something wrong with one …
answered Jun 7 '19 by Zac67
1
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The basic tips are exactly what you need: survey your wireless location for neighbor SSIDs, their channels and traffic survey your location for other sources of EM radiation in the 2.4 GHz band (5 G …
answered Jul 2 '19 by Zac67
0
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There's a bit more to an Internet connection than just bare speed: availability latency oversubscription ratio (real bandwidth at any time of day) included services (DNS, email, ...) …
answered May 28 '20 by Zac67
3
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An ISP provides an uplink to the Internet with a specific line speed. That speed is the maximum bandwidth you can use for the very last part of a connection to another node anywhere on the Internet. … Your link limits any transfer speed you can get (as does any link in between) but it doesn't guarantee any speed. The actual "Internet speed" you get depends on a large number of factors. …
answered Dec 13 '17 by Zac67
3
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if we have an interface with 100Mb speed and full-duplex mode does it mean 100Mb to send and 100Mb to receive ? Yes. … Of course, Ethernet also exists with 1000 Mbit/s or several other speed grades up to 400 Gbit/s (which exclusively use full duplex). …
answered Jan 17 '20 by Zac67

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