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For questions about network switches, the term commonly refers to a multi-port network bridge that processes and routes data at the data link layer (layer 2) of the OSI model.

5
votes
So if you send a correctly formatted spanning tree frame to a switch, it will consume the frame and update the spanning tree application state on the switch accordingly (which may trigger other spanning … And if you send an incorrect spanning tree BPDU to a switch, it will drop it because it's supposed to process it, but it's wrong. …
answered Feb 13 '20 by Darrell Root
3
votes
In theory, a hardware failure on one member of a switch stack will only cause the physical interfaces of that member switch to go down. Uplinks and access ports on other switches will remain online. … So switch stacks improve redundancy for some types of failures, but increase complexity and impair redundancy for other situations (most notably upgrades). …
answered Dec 3 '19 by Darrell Root
5
votes
Yes. You don’t even need a trunk. If all ports on both switches are access ports on Vlan 3, then the port connecting the two switches are on Vlan 3 and both switches form one broadcast domain on that …
answered Jan 19 '20 by Darrell Root