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For questions about network congestion, where a network node or link is carrying more data than it can handle. For instance, you are troubleshooting or trying to find a bottleneck in your network topology.

2
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to use a particular congestion control scheme. … This artificially inflates the congestion window in order to reflect the additional segment that has left the network. …
answered Oct 3 '16 by Ron Maupin
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ECN is used by TCP to inform the hosts about network congestion. RED is used to prevent queues from filling up by randomly dropping queued packets. …
answered Jan 16 '17 by Ron Maupin
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For example, RFC 2001, TCP Slow Start, Congestion Avoidance, Fast Retransmit, and Fast Recovery Algorithms was published in January 1997, and it was obsoleted by RFC 2581, TCP Congestion Control which … was updated by RFC 3990, Increasing TCP's Initial Window and completely obsoleted by RFC 5681, TCP Congestion Control. …
answered May 1 '21 by Ron Maupin
1
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Don't confuse layer-2 and layer-3. Ethernet flow control is a poorly-supported, layer-2 control for layer-2 frames, and it tries to prevent the tiny switch buffers from filling. QoS is a layer-3 contr …
answered Jul 6 '17 by Ron Maupin
0
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If workstation1 will start downloading data from a website (client-server) with a speed of 5mbps, or 625kBps (since 5 megabits equals 625 kilobytes), will the connection for other people workin …
answered Feb 17 '17 by Ron Maupin
0
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TCP is a reliable transport protocol, and it will request missing segments to be resent. The segments get sent, get lost or corrupted, and resent. This causes more data to be sent.
answered Feb 29 '16 by Ron Maupin
2
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For instance, when the window is larger on a single link, congestion along the link could be a bigger factor. … Because of congestion on the single link, IP packets could be dropped, causing TCP to resend segments, thus slowing down the transfer. …
answered Jan 7 '16 by Ron Maupin
2
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Edit: TCP congestion control is completely determined and handled by the sender based on the fact that it must resend data. … For example, QUIC (an application-layer protocol on top of UDP) has flow control, and the intention is to improve congestion control and add things like FEC. …
answered May 6 '21 by Ron Maupin
3
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This is to be expected if your routers are filling the buffers. If you are using ping to test this, understand that ping has the lowest priority. Depending on your traffic mix, you may want to use Qo …
answered Nov 23 '15 by Ron Maupin
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Traffic on a switch is sent directly from host interface to host interface. You could certainly have have multiple interfaces running at full speed that overload a single interface that is the same sp …
answered Jan 11 '19 by Ron Maupin