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For questions about failover in a network aspect. For instance, if you have a stack of switches and you have problems with master/slave failover or a Firewall setup with multiple hot standby's where it doesn't failover correctly. Failover can also be used in relation to a network design.

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No. HSRP defines the first hop for hosts sending traffic off the LAN. it has nothing to do with how traffic coming from somewhere else is routed, and any router connected to the LAN will put it on the …
answered Feb 19 '16 by Ron Maupin
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The simplest way to achieve a failover is by using floating static routes. You are going to need a default route (0.0.0.0/0) to your ISPs. …
answered Mar 1 '17 by Ron Maupin
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The easiest way is probably to use AD to create floating static routes. I assume you are using a default static route. Use one for each WAN connection, and specifically set the AD on each. The lower A …
answered Aug 14 '16 by Ron Maupin
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Yes, you just need some way to "rate" your preference for the WAN ports such as administrative distance.
answered Sep 14 '15 by Ron Maupin
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HSRP is for your LAN, not your WAN. Normally it is very simple if you use static default routes. On your WAN, you probably have a default route: ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 <next hop> A static route …
answered Sep 18 '17 by Ron Maupin
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According to Cisco, there are three ways for the formerly Active, now Standby, primary unit to again become Active: Active unit failed (power or hardware) Failover link failed at startup Interface failure …
answered Dec 18 '15 by Ron Maupin
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Based on your question about the routing protocol, I will assume you are not running one, but you are using static routes, probably static default routes. You could use a routing protocol, but you wo …
answered Jan 12 '16 by Ron Maupin
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By far, the fastest failover is a port channel. As long as even one link in a port channel is up, the port channel remains up. …
answered Dec 3 '16 by Ron Maupin
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I don't see why you can't have two interfaces and just let the routing protocol decide which link works, and which doesn't. You could manipulate the delay on one if you want an active/standby setup, b …
answered Apr 19 '17 by Ron Maupin
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If the failover server does not have a TCP connection with the sending host, TCP will send a RST upon receiving a segment in a non-existent connection, killing the connection on the host, which will need … to establish a new connection with the failover server. …
answered Apr 26 '21 by Ron Maupin
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A quick Internet search turns up Network > WAN Failover & LB directly from the source: You need to choose a load balancing method. … By default, the SonicWALL will select Basic Active/Passive Failover as the method, but there are four load balancing methods available: Basic Active/Passive Failover: When this setting is selected …
answered Feb 10 '16 by Ron Maupin
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I'm not a Juniper expert, but other vendors have done something similar for heartbeats (Hey! I'm still alive!), or other reasons. There is no technical reason why that specific address range was chos …
answered Oct 3 '16 by Ron Maupin
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The section in the documentation to which you refer says: The ASA does not support connecting an EtherChannel to a switch stack. If the ASA EtherChannel is connected cross stack, and if the mast …
answered Dec 12 '15 by Ron Maupin
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If preempt is not configured, it cannot take over and failover does not occur. …
answered Jun 3 '16 by Ron Maupin
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It is possible, even likely, that at least one (probably more) frames will be lost on any failover. The speed of the failover is highly dependent on what type of redundancy you are using. …
answered Sep 15 '15 by Ron Maupin

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