11

Why then does the client need to encrypt the broadcast using the GTK? It doesn't. Since the AP broadcasts, not the client, the client doesn't use the GTK to encrypt the frame. The AP does. Why can't the client just encrypt the broadcast frame using its PTK, and the AP decrypt it, ... Exactly. This is what happens. ... the AP decrypt it, then encrypt ...


6

Data-Wifi doesn't have guest-mode enabled (mbssid guest-mode) so it will not beacon. See Also: guest-mode and mbssid guest-mode


6

That depends on how the access point is configured. If it's configured as a router you'll only see one address of the access point itself, but if it's configured as a bridge between the wireless and the wired network, you'll see a MAC address for every connected client.


6

You cannot light such a building with a single WAP. You need to do a site survey and plan how to distribute WAPs across the building to provide coverage. Each WAP requires a wired uplink. The main difference between AC Lite and AC LR is 2x2 MIMO vs 3x3 MIMO for 2.4 GHz. WAP power is generally limited to 250 mW, so there's no difference. The LR should ...


5

Yes, it's possible. Your wireless clients can communicate with each other (although on some consumer devices, you have to explicitly allow this).


5

A WAP doesn't convert a broadcast frame into unicast frames to each individual Wi-Fi client. It sends a single broadcast frame to all the Wi-Fi clients at the same time. Sending a frame to each client really defeats the purpose of broadcast. That is why the WAP will broadcast at the slowest possible rate. All the devices need to be able to receive the single ...


5

Cisco's policy is to offer free software upgrades for security vulnerabilities. They only let you get the feature set you already have, and they give you the smallest "feature version" upgrade for which they have a fix. One trick is to find a security vulnerability that affects your current version requiring an upgrade to the version you want. Recent ...


4

Monitor Mode provides constant channel scanning with attack detection and forensics (packet capture) capabilities. Capture packets regardless of connected network. No association to AP needed (and no authentication). Because it is not connected to a network, you can't process the Wi-Fi frames. If you switch your AP into monitor mode all clients will be ...


4

A LAN is a layer-2 network, and all hosts on a LAN are peers. Routers route between networks, not from a LAN back to the same LAN. Switches and WAPs are bridges that operate on layer-2 LANs, and neither requires a router unless the hosts need to communicate to/from a different LAN.


4

Generally, no. Listing one of the 11g rates as mandatory prevents 11b clients from associating, but other, lower rates can be listed as optional. However, the lowest rate for 11g (ODFM) is 6 MHz, and that is higher than the minimum 11b rate (1 MHz), so a 11b client could, in theory, connect farther away than a 11g client. The goal of all this is to ...


4

Yes, you can do that. It is called max-associations option under ssid configuration section and can be done per SSID. Let us say you want to set the maximum number of devices that can associate using your_ssid to 5: # conf t (config)# dot11 ssid your_ssid (config-ssid)# max-associations 5 (config-ssid)# end You can check more details at ...


4

Apparently, you don't actually have a controller, which would make things very simple. But briefly: You need to configure each access point with its own IP address. Each access point will use a different RF channel. Both access points will have the same SSID and same WPA key. Both access points will map the SSID to the same VLAN. This will allow your ...


4

A company will register with the IEEE to get an OUI (Organizationally Unique Identifier). Beyond that, the company is free to assign MAC addresses within the OUI as it sees fit. There are no outside standards or requirements for how a company assigns MAC addresses within its OUI. What you are asking can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. There is ...


4

You certainly can do it: + . . . . . . . . + . . . . + . . wifi | | | AP cam cam | ===+===========+====SW | pc You definitely don't need a router, but you will have to work out the addressing of your equipment. Usually cameras etc are configured to ...


4

You're on exactly the right track. The basic of VLANs are very simple A switch can be partitioned into separate VLANs Now we have to say which VLAN each port is connected to; this is called an "access port" for a given VLAN So far, that's just like having separate switches, but perhaps more convenient. The hosts don't know anything about VLANs To join ...


3

Layer-2 devices like switches an WAPs get IP addresses for management. There are unmanaged switches which don't get, and don't have an option for, IP addresses because they don't need them since they are not managed. Some WAPs (LWAPs) don't get configured with IP address as you normally would, but they get an IP address from DHCP and a configuration from a ...


3

There you can configure your Access points at different channels, so they wouldn't overlapse and interfere with each other. Also, configure the power of your AP's. There are some apps for android to monitor wifi frequency usage, that would help you to plan the infrastucture. The pictures below are the example of wifi channel planning and 2.4 GHz wifi channel ...


3

You need proper structured cable pathways. There are standards for this, and your cable installer should be familiar with the ANSI/TIA/EIA-569 Commercial Building Standards for Telecommunications Pathways and Spaces and follow them. Don't ever use power pathways to run low-voltage cabling. This can cause problems, and it is violation of the building codes ...


3

One thing to consider is the rate of flapping. Having worked with a wireless environment with no channel plan or power adjustments and automatic adjustments and channel selection disabled, constantly seeing MAC flap notifications is indicative of a problem on the wireless side of your network. Working with WAPs that allow you to adjust, either manually or ...


3

I was wondering if it is possible to have guest WiFi network on subnet 192.168.1.0/24 and Access Points to that WiFi on subnet 10.0.0.0/24? Since you asked a general question, yes it is possible. As a matter of fact, I highly recommend this approach and all wireless deployments I have a hand in do this if at all possible. However, it is the "if at all ...


3

The Meraki AP's (the higher end ones) have 3 radios: 2.4GHz, and 5GHz for traffic, and a third "maintenance radio". That 3rd radio is what does all the spectrum monitoring and "security" scanning. It is that radio that can hear the non-associated devices within range of it, as long as they're speaking. (The primary reason is to find/use the least congested ...


3

Is the reason I'm not able to see devices that are "passerbys" in my router that my router doesn't have that feature? Yes. By router I am assuming you mean some sort of consumer gateway device with built in 802.11 wireless (hereafter just "wireless"). These devices will not have many of the features found in enterprise solutions. Any wireless device has to ...


3

Access points can be configured to broadcast their SSIDs, or they can be configured to only listen for connections from devices that know a given SSID exists. Virtually all wifi client devices (laptops, mobile phones, tablets, etc) will broadcast at least some information on a periodic basis. This is the information that a listening access point (or ...


3

Which of the channels listed are used by which Access point? For best results, only 1, 6 and 11 are used in the 2.4GHz band. Typically, you would not have the two access points on the same channel because they would tend to interfere with each other. You can manually select the channel, or some APs will pick the "best" one. How many users are supported ...


3

The better approach for deploying AP is a complete site survey to determine the AP density , multipath propagation characteristics, interference, noise etc.. before setting up the AP. The first immediate checkpoint for the scenario in-hand should be checking of SNR, RSSI and operating frequency/co-channel interference. For optimal performance, placement ...


3

We have been running 802.11k (and 802.11v) on our campus network (~9200 AP's) for close to a year. We are using a controller based Wi-Fi infrastructure (Aruba Networks). Our wired network infrastructure is Cisco. We did have to disable the advertisement of 802.11k "Quiet IE"s to prevent some compatibility issues with older clients. While we have CDP and ...


3

Access points don't "wear out." Generally speaking, they either work or they don't. That being said, if your old AP can't run newer protocols, it will keep others from operation at higher data rates. A 802.11b AP will prevent newer APs from operating at g or n speeds. Access points can (and will) interfere with each other if they are on the same channel ...


3

Yes, you can. Computers in this case are in the same network, and they can communicate with each other through the AP.


3

As put in Cisco Networking for Dummies article on Multiple SSIDs with a Single Access Point (AP) (link) The Service Set Identifier (SSID) defines what is thought of as the wireless network. So if you have an SSID that is called Apple and your neighbor’s SSID is called Orange, people can connect to either the Apple or Orange wireless network. You would ...


3

The trick is getting the router to appear on 10/24. DHCP and secondary addressing requires a bunch of VLAN Magic(tm). Assuming no one wants to get that messy... adding routes on the router and ap should get you where you want to be. The problem you have with the bridge is that the AP will not "see" the traffic it's bridging, as at layer-2 the traffic doesn'...


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