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#Solution In this platform sflow has default zero 0 tcam slice allocated sFlow TCAM size # show hardware access-list tcam region | grep "sFlow ACL" sFlow ACL [sflow] size = 0 SPAN+sFlow ACL [span-sflow] size = 0 Span TCAM size # show hardware access-list tcam region | grep "SPAN" ...


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I assume you care about BGP state following that of interface. Since BFD can't be used you are out of options for sub-second liveliness detection, which brings you to BGP keepalives. Both platforms support 1 sec intervals (on Junos you'd configure hold-time of 3 which is 3x1sec), with 3x multiplier, you are down to 3 sec. Not necessarily a great idea, and ...


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Take a look at EEM, otherwise known as embedded event manager. You can configure an applet that takes a specific action (...including downing an interface) when a given even occurs (such as your upstream interface going down). There are examples in the link provided, but the basic idea is that you'll configure an interface tracking group that will watch ...


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"Link State Tracking" is the feature you seek. I'm not sure it's supported on NX-OS, or that switch. SUMMARY STEPS 1. configure terminal 2. link state track [ number ] 3. interface [ interface-id ] 4. link state group [ number ] {upstream | downstream} 5. end Configuring Link State Tracking (1) Configuring Link State Tracking (2)


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If your transit providers are willing to configure BFD with you, yes. That's its intended use.


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You're on the right track -- you're creating PBR entries in the TCAM and using those entries (maybe just one) for many interfaces. In most cases, ACL-like structures are able to be re-used by any number of interfaces. That's why it's okay that the switch only has room for a few hundred entries system-wide.


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I'm surprised <CTRL> + <BREAK> isn't working in SecureCRT. That is the typical key combination for it. Cisco has a helpful list of break hotkeys for a lot of terminal software. PuTTY isn't in the list, but it has a menu command for sending a break sequence.


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Start from this page for the 5500's verified scalability and this for the 3K. In short (...and as mentioned above) the L3 switching module on the 5500 is basically a router on a 16x10GE switch. The verified scalability guide calls out a 256 SVI limit. If your requirement for 650 'interface vlan' maps to SVI's then the 5K is likely not fit for purpose. The ...


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Be sure to understand the limitations of the N5K https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/switches/datacenter/nexus5500/sw/Verified_Scalability/730N11/b_5500_Verified_Scalability_730N11/b_5500_Verified_Scalability_702N11_chapter_01.html That document ist for NXOS 7.3.0, but I don't think that these figures grew all that much on the way to 7.3.3. Most important: ...


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The N3k is suitable for your application. The main advantages of the N5k are the ability to use fabric extenders (very similar to stacking tbh) and to combine fibre channel & Ethernet for networks which have legacy SAN needs, as well as some models having expansion slots. However, it is a more complex product line; and doesn't offer very large MAC & ...


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