New answers tagged

1

Just got it to work. The trick is to have something that generates traffic and triggers the cellular interface to connect. Didnt relize that the IP SLA i had configured on the global vrf made the connection work for me. So basically this fixed it for me: ip sla 1000 icmp-echo 8.8.8.8 vrf DSL threshold 500 timeout 1000 frequency 4 ip sla schedule ...


1

Yes, it can be done, but the physical connection between the devices will be the hardest part. For Ethernet, you need a total distance (including patch cords of less than 100m. You must also pay attention to any building codes or regulations regarding wiring between units. You can assign a subnet for the link between the routers and create static routes on ...


1

#Solution In this platform sflow has default zero 0 tcam slice allocated sFlow TCAM size # show hardware access-list tcam region | grep "sFlow ACL" sFlow ACL [sflow] size = 0 SPAN+sFlow ACL [span-sflow] size = 0 Span TCAM size # show hardware access-list tcam region | grep "SPAN" ...


1

When you have a layer-2 configuration with VLANs, each VLAN basically acts as a virtual switch. That's the point of VLANs, after all. You can think of the traffic flow as coming in through a port, getting split up (demultiplexed) into different VLAN flows, getting L2-switched independently in each VLAN, and then on the outgoing side, flows from different ...


4

The ISR 4000 series routers come with a platform shaper that will limit total throughput through the L3 forwarding feature. In the case of the 4331, these figures are: Default: 100Mbps FL-4330-PERF-K9: 300Mbps FL-4330-BOOST-K9: as fast as the router's CPU cores can deliver. Having the Boost license unlocks line rate for the given 1Gbit/s sec interfaces. ...


5

Another aspect to and expanding a bit what zac67 already gave in his answer: VLAN IDs used on tagged (sub)interfaces of routed interfaces (a.k.a. no switchport) can be completely independent from the switch's "switching" context [1]. In extenso: the VLAN tag used on the subinterface does not appear as a L2 VLAN on the switch, neither consumes nor ...


2

A subinterface is part of a physical interface, used for a single VLAN. Usually, you only have those for routed interfaces (L3) that do not take part in L2 forwarding = switching. An SVI (switch virtual interface) is a network-layer binding to the VLAN instance itself, used for routing, management, DHCP, ... - any higher-layer function apart from L2 ...


1

In Cisco's mind, this should be handled by multi-link PPP, but having had serious problems with their quarter-baked MLPPP code, we ("I") switched the problem customers to CEF per-packet. In this mode, you can't rely on IPCP to setup the pseudo-ECMP. The route IPCP creates does not include the interface, so when duplicate entries are added -- 0/0 ...


10

$1$ marks the MD5-crypt password hash also commonly used in past years for user passwords in Linux systems. In that function, it's now been pretty much superseded by the similar SHA256-crypt and SHA512-crypt hashes ($5$ and $6$). None of those are just a single run of the underlying hash function, but iterate the hash repeatedly and include a salt (the part ...


11

Cisco devices add a salt to the passwords before hashing so they can't be cracked with dictionary attacks (such as rainbow tables). The salt is partially made up of the device ID, if I recall. MD5 is mostly still safe to use but is known to have collisions, so it's almost always suggested to use another hashing algorithm. On some of the more recent ...


5

Yes, absolutely; there are a variety of ways to accomplish this. I'll suggest two just to give you some inspiration. Match Protocol option On your route-map toward the BGP neighbors, you can match protocol connected in a stanza to determine whether you propagate those routes. For example: route-map to-isp deny 100 description don't announce my connected ...


4

Yes. It will be dependent on the exact operating system that runs on the router, but generally redistribution is configured on the router level. I.E. apply to all peers. You can however filters routes that are announced to peers based on various criteria, and especially communities. So one way of doing this is: apply a route-map on the "redistribute ...


1

That won't work. After all, you could swap a module for a larger one and then 0/3-1/3 would mean something else...


0

I assume you care about BGP state following that of interface. Since BFD can't be used you are out of options for sub-second liveliness detection, which brings you to BGP keepalives. Both platforms support 1 sec intervals (on Junos you'd configure hold-time of 3 which is 3x1sec), with 3x multiplier, you are down to 3 sec. Not necessarily a great idea, and ...


-1

Take a look at EEM, otherwise known as embedded event manager. You can configure an applet that takes a specific action (...including downing an interface) when a given even occurs (such as your upstream interface going down). There are examples in the link provided, but the basic idea is that you'll configure an interface tracking group that will watch ...


-1

"Link State Tracking" is the feature you seek. I'm not sure it's supported on NX-OS, or that switch. SUMMARY STEPS 1. configure terminal 2. link state track [ number ] 3. interface [ interface-id ] 4. link state group [ number ] {upstream | downstream} 5. end Configuring Link State Tracking (1) Configuring Link State Tracking (2)


0

If your transit providers are willing to configure BFD with you, yes. That's its intended use.


0

(basically, I'm justg rephrasing what the linked article and the other answers say): To use a (remote) router's AUX as a 1-port console server (a.k.a terminal server), you'll need: A) a rollover cable from AUX of the router acting as the console server to CONSOLE of the device you want to access. B) these lines on the router acting as the console server: ! ...


2

The below topology is what is described by the article access to the console via the AUX port. It means you telnet (or ssh) to an exposed port on the existing router which has been configured to make its AUX port available for use via telnet/ssh. For this to work, you need to be able to login to the existing router. A common way of doing this in lights-out ...


2

This idea would work only if the second router is configured in a network and is operating. You could then use it to connect to the unconfigured router's console. In effect, you're using the second router as a terminal server.


0

Nexus 7k support VLAN translation, so you could e.g. translate the remote VLANs 100, 200, 300 (from a trunk) to 1100, 1200, 1300 in one zone and 2100, 2200, 2300 in another. VLID translations can be tricky (esp. with RPVST+ or multiple MSTP instances), so I'd seriously recommend renumbering the VLANs. You can use translations as an interim migration scheme ...


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