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If you are desperate to get some kind of link up without replacing the cable you can probably get a 100 megabit link working by re-wiring the cable in a non-standard way so that the good pairs are on the pins used by 100 megabit Ethernet. It's not a great practice though.


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Ethernet cables come in two forms, UTP or STP, UTP stands for Unshielded Twisted Pair, whereas STP is Shielded Twisted Pair. STP should be favored because it reduces the chances of interfering with other cables and is protected. UTP can be used, although its better indoor since it has no protection and is cheaper. But simply put they are practically the same,...


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Generally, you cannot repair Cat 5/6/7/8 cabling other than at termination, and only when there enough slack left. You could use a time-domain reflectometer to locate the fault - hopefully at one end -, remove the faulty segment and re-terminate. If you decide to replace the cable, heed Ron's warning and hire a skilled installer. If maximum pull tension or ...


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USB 3 HDDs can exceed 200 MB/s which is nearly twice 1G Ethernet speed. Normal flash sticks are far slower though. USB 3.2 tops out at more than 1.5 GB/s, even exceeding 10G Ethernet bandwidth. Further details are off-topic here, I'd recommend testing on your platform. Overhead for network transfer depends on the protocol you're using. Most commonly, ...


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100BASE-TX uses 4b/5b encoding with MLT-3 over dedicated send and receive pairs with a spectral bandwidth of just 31.25 MHz. 1000BASE-T uses PAM-5, twice the bandwidth and bidirectional send/receive over all pairs - but its four-dimensional trellis coded modulation should make it no more sensitive to external noise than 100BASE-TX. In a high-noise ...


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