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21

I would consider this too much for one rack. You always want to leave yourself at least some space for the future. I have seldom been in situations where less space is used in a rack over time, rather quite often the opposite (you end up needing more). Figure it this way: Typical 48 port switch = 1U Typical 48 port patch panel = 2U Typical full rack = ...


9

600 ports would be 25U of 24port panels, just for the RJ45s! Once switches, cable management, and power are added in, that's going to be a very full rack. And it's going to have poor air flow. It can be done in one rack frame, but you lose some on cable management and future expandability. As this sounds like an "infrastructure wiring" situation, once ...


7

I usually trade off space for neatness. My typical layout is: 1U 24P Patch Panel 2U Cable Organizer 1U 48P Switch 2U Cable Organizer 1U 24P Patch Panel 1' patch cables from top patch panel to the top row of ports on the switch. 1' cables from the bottom patch panel to the bottom row of ports on the switch. These all go under the covers from the cable ...


5

There would be a number of ways to do this that are better than the way you are currently doing it. Pick from any below that fits your circumstances and access. If all the IP cameras communicate with a server on the same L2 network, then the server should have all the cameras in it's ARP table already. Simply pull the ARP table on the server. If you know ...


2

600 Ports per rack would be possible provided you choose the right racks, cable management accessories and patching style. I'd recommend a 2 Post rack with a pair of high density cable managers. I've personally used Panduit's WMPVHC45E cable managers for similar densities. Now If you use angled patch panels to terminate your copper cables, you can eliminate ...


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