18

With the arrival of 802.11n and with 802.11ac almost here, this can be a viable option. However the expectation of cost savings may not be accurate as you may have additional initial costs (for instance hiring a wireless consultant to make sure things go right) or even in ongoing costs (do you need new staff?). You will carefully have to consider your path ...


18

Wi-Fi is IEEE 802.11, the same way that ethernet is IEEE 802.3, token ring is IEEE 802.5, FDDI is IEEE 802.8, etc. These are some of the IEEE LAN protocols, and the IEEE working groups associated with the protocols. See this answer for more IEEE 802 working groups.


16

If your APs are just bridging clients from the wireless right onto your wired network, then you're going to see this from time to time. Clients will appear from different ports as they re-associate to other APs/cells in the ESSID. I'm presuming you're talking about Cisco IOS here, based on the term "MACFLAP", which appears in their log messages when this ...


16

IEEE 802.11 is a standard that describes procedures, limits, values, algorithms to enstablish a WLAN connection. Wi-Fi is a brand name owned by the Wi-Fi Alliance that certifies with pre-defined tests the interoperability between all device with this mark. WiFi devices are based on IEEE 802.11. Not every device that uses IEEE 802.11 is Wi-Fi cerified.


15

Depending on the version of WLC code that you're running, you can either manually disable the status LED on the AP or flash it by logging into the WLC and issuing a command... Then just walk around with your laptop and turn off / flash LEDs until you find the right AP. To disable the status LED, use this... config ap led-state disable AP27 To flash the ...


14

your best bet will probably be to put a wan emulator in-between the wlan network and rest of the network. Even better if you are using multiple SSIDs, each going to its own VLAN (you'd then place the WAN emulator between the SSID's VLAN you want to break and the rest of the network. You could then configure the emulator to create the crappy network (ie: ...


14

In Short,Wi-Fi is more of a technology name and 802.11 is the IEEE standard. There are different variants of 802.11 based on your bandwidth ,Modulation schemes etc. I would always use the specific standard in documents and datasheets instead of just mentioning Wi-Fi.This will help to give a clear cut information to the reader and engineers as well. The ...


13

The IEEE 802.11 standards define two methods for a client device to discover wireless networks in the area. Both methods are based on using 802.11 management frames as defined in these standards. The first method is a passive method. All 802.11 infrastructure devices will send out a beacon frame approximately every 100ms (this is the default for many ...


12

Merely putting personal-use internet on a different subnet is normally not sufficient unless that subnet is firewalled from the rest of the company; there are all kinds of internet vulnerabilities that hijack a users' PC and pose a threat to your company unless you are smart about protecting yourself. This is one example of a innocent-looking Wordpress ...


12

Cisco LWAPs will do this process in order to try and find a controller: CAPWAP broadcast on the local subnet Check NVRAM for previous controllers/mobility groups and try those. OTAP (remove now though) DHCP Option 43/60 DNS Lookup for "CISCO-CAPWAP-CONTROLLER.localdomain" If the controllers are on the local subnet, then it will find those via broadcast, if ...


11

In 802.11 wireless (which I assume is your case), typically broadcast/multicast frames (as well as many management frames) are transmitted at the lowest base/basic/required (term varies by vendor) data rate. This is separate from the supported data rates. Typically, for best range and maximum compatibility, this defaults to the 1Mbps data rate, although in ...


11

I have come across three different ways you may be able to go about disabling 802.11b, depending on your situation and wireless vendor. I will start with what should generally be the most preferential choice, but any of them will work. Your wireless vendor may provide a setting to "disable 802.11b clients" or similar. Generally this will implement the ...


11

Hire a professional who has warehouse experience. If you were using an enterprise vendor, I would suggest looking at their consulting services as they have probably done this with their products a number of times. Warehouses and stadiums are considered the two most difficult wireless environments to work in with 802.11. There are many factors that make ...


11

The distinction to understand is that while an 802.11 device is transmitting to a receiving device, either one (or both) of these devices may not be the actual source or destination of the L2 traffic. So this can create situations where you need four different distinct addresses: Transmitter Address (TA) Receiver Address (RA) Source Address (SA) Destination ...


11

Why then does the client need to encrypt the broadcast using the GTK? It doesn't. Since the AP broadcasts, not the client, the client doesn't use the GTK to encrypt the frame. The AP does. Why can't the client just encrypt the broadcast frame using its PTK, and the AP decrypt it, ... Exactly. This is what happens. ... the AP decrypt it, then encrypt ...


10

Keep in mind that a higher frequency doesn't translate to moving data faster, rather it is the modulation of the signal that determines that data rate. The 802.11n standard either requires or makes optional the same set of major features and modulations in both frequency ranges. However, that being said, there are a number of best or common practices that ...


10

This entirely depends on the chipset in your device, as not all of them have equal capabilities on Tx/Rx rates. I personally have found no better resources than wikidevi.com for looking up the capabilities of wireless network adapters. To understand wireless that is 802.11n or newer, you need to understand the shorthand often used in their technical ...


9

Flapping events don't require ingress traffic alternating between ports -- a simple change from ingress of a MAC address on port A to port B on a switch quickly enough will cause a flapping event to be logged; for instance, a live migration of a virtual machine from one host to another will often cause a MAC flapping notification. As the other answers have ...


9

It definitely matters: 'Omni' refers to the symmetry in the plane perpendicular to the axis of the antenna; That is, the torus around the antenna axis. But 'omni' antennas are VERY sensitive to variation from the vertical. If you're aiming down into an open area (to the left, as suggested by the photo,) then ok, tip them as is shown. But generally, you ...


9

Assuming a Cisco WLC... Go to "WLAN > Select the WLAN Profile > General Tab > Radio Policy" Updating my answer to clarify a few things... 802.11a operates at a maximum of 54Mbps, only in the 5GHz bands 802.11b operates at a maximum of 11Mbps, only in the 2.4GHz bands 802.11g operates at a maximum of 54Mbps, only in the 2.4GHz bands Keep in mind that ...


9

Unfortunately there was no interest in this so i had to find it out myself. Here's the answer from a great book. Book: https://www.safaribooksonline.com/library/view/80211-wireless-networks/0596100523/ch04.html#


9

Lets test this out then. If we send multicast packets to multiple devices connected to a WiFi access point at a constant rate, then the access point should report the same amount of traffic. To run this test, I'm sending packets from a wired PC to an an android tablet and a raspberry pi. Don't have any iOS devices. The network testing tool iperf can easily ...


9

As I understand Wifi, it can never true multicast, as each device holds a '1:1" relationship with the AP, and then receives the same packet... then the next device connects and gets the same packet. Your understanding is flawed. Multicast does exist, but like most management traffic on a wireless network it must run at the lowest supported base/basic/...


8

Yes, it is feasible to install them yourself. I would not consider it reasonable to pay someone else $1000 to install two wireless access points. There is a learning curve but with a little time and effort you can learn enough to install these yourself. Have a read: Aironet 2600 Getting Started Guide Aironet 2600 Deployment Guide Configuration Example


8

802.11 are the IEEE specifications that implement wireless local area networks. In common parlance I think 802.11 is more or less synonomous with Wi-Fi. Note that Wi-Fi is actually a trademarked term of the Wi-Fi Alliance.


7

Multicast rate has to be the lowest common denominator so that all devices can receive it successfully. Multicast frames cannot be acknowledged[1], so if a peer fails to receive it, the sender will not know, and will not retransmit the frame. Having loss rates of more than 1% per receiver is common. Much higher loss rates can be expected if there is heavy ...


7

Is it feasible? Yes. Is it a good idea? TL;DR: No. That depends on the exact details of the installation (configuring the devices, physically installing, power, cabling, etc) and the unique wireless aspects (transmission, interference, coverage, etc) of the installation. You should be able to figure out everything as you go along. On the other hand, if ...


7

802.11i was an amendment to the 1999 802.11 standard, rather than a separate standard. 802.11-2007 was created to roll up that and 7 other amendments (a, b, d, e, g, h, i, j). Edit: Here's the wikipedia page.


7

A standard TCPDump, without any modifications to the mode of the Wireless NIC, will not display ALL frames traversing the wireless network. It will only display frames directed at (and capable of being received by) your station. TCPDump is just grabbing the information that is specifically delivered to your station, decrypted, and presented to the OS at ...


7

First, Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11) is not ethernet (IEEE 802.3) any more than token ring (IEEE 802.5) or any of the other IEEE LAN standards other than 802.3 are ethernet. The frame headers are different for Wi-Fi and ethernet. Wi-Fi, ethernet, token ring, FDDI, etc. are all LAN standards for OSI layer-1 and layer2 which encapsulate datagrams for upper layer ...


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