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Very Old question but since I'm looking for the same answer I can add a bit of detail the other answers missed. Wifi uses 3 address packets. Client MAC, AP MAC and destination MAC. An ethernet to Wi-Fi bridge has a problem because the ap will reject packets that don't have the client MAC address. There's no easy solution that works with this design so wifi ...


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Referring to the 4 states an 802.11 station can be with respect to the Robust Security Network (RSN), we see that: moving from state 1 to state 2 happens when 802.11 Authentication completes successfully (the Open Systems Authentication you see in the diagram in the question) moving from state 2 to state 3 happens when Association completes successfully ...


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The 4-way handshake occurs after the client is Authenticated and Associated. The 4-way handshake is used to generate the keys used to encrypt various types of traffic (Unicast, Multicast, Broadcast) between the AP and client.


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40 MHz channels were only introduced in 802.11n (WiFi 4 in the new naming scheme from the WiFi Alliance). 802.11g (WiFi 3) and earlier physical layers, could not use 40 MHz channels. 802.11n, however, operates at both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands. So if your clients support 40 MHz bands (802.11n, 802.11ac, 802.11ax - or WiFi 4, 5, 6, respectively), they should be ...


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The other answer is correct. However, just to add on regarding the difference in availability of channels 12, 13 and 14 in the US, Japan and Europe/rest-of-the-world, it is because of differences in the regulatory situation (spectral occupancy is different in each country, and regulators want to avoid interference or excessive interference between bands). ...


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