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1

No, the purpose of a mesh system is to use a common SSID (so clients can roam.) The nodes do have distinct BSSIDs. In fact, an access point may have multiple BSSIDs if it has more than one radio and/or serves multiple SSIDs to separate clients into different groups / WLANs. Juniper has a good explanation.


0

Well, if your problem is about the MAC address, actually you can quite spoof your MAC address in many ways. For example by using Scapy. Here is a snippet I shamelessly taken from this thread: >>> send(Ether(src="ab:cd:ef:ab:cd:ef", dst="ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff")/IP(src="1.2.3.4", dst="3.4.5.6")/UDP(dport=9)/b"...


1

The WLC uses the number as the Destination Port for CAPWAP Ctl/Data [...] In this context "Ctl" (Control) is the management traffic between the A.P. itself and the controller (pushing configuration, gathering information, firmware updates, etc...), and "Data" is the data streams from the wireless clients connected to this A.P. So when ...


2

It's right there in the footnote: Arbitrary port number is assigned to every AP from range 1024 - 65535 when the AP joins the WLC. The WLC uses the number as the Destination Port for CAPWAP Ctl/Data as long as the AP is connected.


2

Option one is a "wireless bridge". Certainly common enough, but wifi is often too slow and unstable. Option two is similar to #1. (slow, and surprisingly easy to break.) Option three is code violation. You cannot put low voltage cabling in the same conduit as high voltage cabling. This is for safety reasons; there's very little concern of powerline ...


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