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If you just look at the network, leaving out all other factors (source and destination hardware and software limitations, overhead on intermediate devices/routers, ...), there are essentially two factors: bandwidth and round-trip time. For a larger network, the bandwidth of the slowest link in the path is the one relevant - obviously, your throughput cannot ...


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Comment 4 in Ron’s answer is vitally important and dominant for long distance data copies over tcp. You just can’t fill up a large bandwidth pipe with a tcp socket over a long (or even medium) distance. If you are copying a large file long distance one approach is to split and use multiple tcp sockets. Another approach is to use file transfer software ...


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Typically, if you need to use the host that is the target of a mirror, then you need a separate network connection for that. The connection used for the mirror is going to be overwhelmed with all the traffic it is mirroring, and it will become practically useless as a regular host interface. You should install a second NIC in the host and use that to ...


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Edited: In theory, it makes no difference. If the slowest link between the source and destination is 100Mb (for example), then the transfer speed is 1E10*8/1E8, or 800 secs (ignoring overhead). In practice, there a few factors that can make a difference. Disk transfer speeds of the source and destination computers. Other processes that may be running ...


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WiMAX is broadband technology to provide wirelessly access to layer 1 (physical) and MAC layer. It has been used to provide broadband access to user on wireless (like wifi by on larger distance). Regarding voice service, it's bit challenging due to higher Latency (around 60ms ~ 70ms) compared to normal cellular network. I remembered there was a time ...


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WiMax is used for WAN access by some ISPs. It's not used for cellular services, only for cellular backhaul. WiMax is somewhat similar to Wi-Fi but has carrier features and much longer reach. It's completely different from traditional cellular services, the differences would most likely fill a book. For a start, you can find overviews here https://en....


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