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1

No, there's no standard practice for this kind of 'hidden' network. A /31 subnet with two usable addresses is all you need. Likely, your best bet is to use an obscure subnet from the RFC 1918 address ranges (192.168.0.0/16, 172.16.0.0/12, 10.0.0.0/8) that has little chance to be in use already (e.g. 10.196.188.88/31). Make sure you document your choice. [...


4

There are a number of misunderstandings in your question: Did they just write this block belong to this RIR, this other block belong to that RIR, etc... That is all that the IANA does (at least in respect of IP blocks), it does not have servers or routers that manage transfer of data to or from said IP blocks. and RIRs like "Yeah, when we send ...


-2

If destination host is within LAN network :- When packet goes to LAYER2 OSI arpa give payload to arp if finding ip is within a LAN network ARP is generated with sender Mac :- 0.0.0.0 which means not known and then this arpa goes to LAYER2 ARPA, ARPA made a Ethernet II frame in which frame is encapsulated with senader Mac FFFF.FFFF.FFFF which means ...


1

ARP packets include the sender's MAC address and IP address (labeled sender's protocol address in the image, below).


3

When a device tries to associate an IP address with a MAC address for a given device, it sends ARP requests to all devices connected to the same network. For IPv4 that's correct. IPv6 uses the Neighbor Discovery Protocol (NDP). how does the searching device find the MAC addresses of the other devices in the first place? It doesn't. ARP uses the link-layer ...


3

When a device tries to associate an IP address with a MAC address for a given device, it sends ARP requests to all devices connected to the same network. It is really a device trying to discover the MAC address for a given IPv4 address (IPv6 uses NDP). My question is this: how does the searching device find the MAC addresses of the other devices in the ...


2

They're asking you to create 3 different subnets. You're overlapping because rather than carrying on from the 2nd subnet your first operation produced, you're just slicing the same initial net in smaller chunks, so of course they overlap, it's still the same network. Your first operation produced 4 networks, 2nd one being 192.168.1.64, Ideally, you'd want to ...


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