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You've actually complicated matters somewhat by making a few incorrect statements so I'll pick through your question on an individual basis. In a router , you can create and configure multiple DHCP pools each one with its own default route DHCP pools will not have a default 'route'. The DHCP server will communicate a default 'gateway' to clients which I ...


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On a DHCP server (which may be integrated in a router), you can configure multiple scopes with one or more address pools each. Each scope matches a local interface subnet or is used with a relay, which in turn is used for address matching (per option 82, sometimes policies are used). DHCP options like DNS server and routers are usually configured on a scope (...


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I believe pool is chosen by the incoming interface of the router or DHCP relay. Router match pool which addresses are matching incoming interface network/netmask. Several pools on a router(R1) may not be tied to R1 interfaces because DHCP packet can be received through router/DHCP relay(R2). In that case relayed packet will also have a field of incoming ...


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The RFC 1918 IP address ranges are marked as private, meaning they can't and mustn't be used on the open Internet. What you do with those addresses within your (private) network is entirely up to you. A proxy doesn't have an inherent logic to decide whether it's required or not. Actually, it's the source node ("client") that decides whether to use ...


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The 192.168.0.0/16 range is a Private IPv4 address range as defined by RFC 1918, Address Allocation for Private Internets, but that does not mean it is defined as "internal." It means that the ISPs have agreed to not route packets with those addresses on the public Internet, but that does not mean that IPv4 distinguishes Private addresses from any ...


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If the host is a router (a router is a host), then this perfectly normal, and the router will hapilly forward the packet according to its routing table (dropping it if it has no route for the destination) otherwise the host will simply drop the packet. Note that all modern operating systems also have routing capabilities and the packet may be passed on a ...


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